Jul 05, 2020  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog

Courses


 

Art Studio

  
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    ARTS 4850 Web Design II


    This course will introduce intermediate web students to more advanced coding, design and usability for websites. Students will learn advanced tools and techniques for creating well-designed interactive Web Sites. This is a Technology Intensive course. Prerequisite(s): ARTS 2820  AND ARTS 3830 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ARTS 4860 3-D Character Animation


    An introduction to character animation, the course covers the fundamental principles, concepts, and processes used to develop characters and create computer-animated sequences. Skills and knowledge gained in Advanced 3-D Computer Graphics are applied to the animation processes. Class work includes the production of several short computer-animated pieces that are output to videotape. Students will be charged an additional Studio Art Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): ARTS 2990  AND ARTS 3850  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ARTS 4865 Group 3-D Animation Project


    A two part summer group production exercise, this course utilizes the fundamental principles, concepts and processes of 3D animation and applies them to planning and execution of an animated piece. Students learn to work as a team on a single animated film, being provided with a concept, script and storyboard by the instructor. Students are encouraged to concentrate on particular aspects of production that they are proficient at and attracted to, such as modeling, lightning, rigging, animation, rendering, and editing, yet participate in all aspects of production. The animation process in these courses directly reflects the process of animation production at an actual professional studio, helping to prepare students for a career as a member of a professional animation staff. Skills and knowledge gained in Arts 285 and 385 are implemented. These courses will be offered during Summer Semesters I and II. Both must run in sequence. Prerequisite(s): ARTS 3850  and ARTS 4860  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ARTS 4870 Advanced Character Animation


    A continued exploration of character animation, this course reviews the fundamental principles, concepts, and processes used to create computer-animated sequences, combining them with pre-and post-production skills acquired, and applies them to the planning and execution of advanced animated pieces. Skills and knowledge gained in Character Animation I are applied to the animation process. Students will be charged an additional Studio Art Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): ARTS 2990  AND ARTS 4860 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ARTS 4880 Advanced Cell Animation


    Develops an advanced understanding of the concepts and techniques used in the art of traditional cell animation. In-depth study and practical use of the methods of kinetic motion and physics with an emphasis on the development of the ability to articulate and communicate a character’s personality, motivation, and psychological expression. Students will be charged an additional Studio Art Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): ARTS 2990  AND ARTS 3880 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ARTS 4890 Advanced Projects in Flash


    Interactive multimedia incorporates elements of traditional visual art, design, movement, sound, video, the internet, actionscript coding2.0/3.0, photography, animation as well as the element sof tie and human interaction. Certainly you can incorporate some or all of these elements into such things as web sites ( web art, web games, toys, greeting cards, etc…), CD-ROMS, corporate presentations, interactive games, installation art, digital portfolios etc. In this course we are going to create web-based interactive animation projects that are both visually and mentally stimulating, creative, intelligent, and aesthetically pleasing as well as technically proficient. Prerequisite(s): ARTS 4830 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ARTS 4930 BA Studio Senior Seminar


    This course directs the BA Studio student to prepare visual, written, and oral presentations to showcase their acquired skills through the assembly of a hard copy and digital portfolio of visual and written work, as well as supervised research in the development of career goals and career opportunities. Covers selected topics in the areas of art history, art criticism, art technology, art theory, and business practices as they pertain to a professional career in studio art. Students will be charged an additional Studio Art Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ARTS 4930 BA Studio Senior Seminar (SAMPLE)


    This course directs the BA Studio student to prepare visual, written, and oral presentations to showcase their acquired skills through the assembly of a hard copy and digital portfolio of visual and written work, as well as supervised research in the development of career goals and career opportunities. Covers selected topics in the areas of art history, art criticism, art technology, art theory, and business practices as they pertain to a professional career in studio art. Students will be charged an additional Studio Art Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ARTS 4940 BFA Studio Senior Seminar


    Covers selected topics in the areas of art history, art criticism, art technology, art theory, and business practices as they pertain to a professional career in studio art. This course directs the BFA student to prepare visual, written, and oral presentations to showcase their acquired skills through the assembly of a hard copy and digital portfolio of visual and written work. Research and development of career goals and career opportunities, as well as supervised research and planning in preparation for the development of the Senior Thesis Project. Students will be charged an additional Studio Art Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ARTS 4950 Senior Thesis Project


    This course is intended to provide a culminating experience for the art or design major. Emphasis will be placed on personal philosophy in the development of visual imagery. A complete portfolio presentation in the studio area of specialization is required for successful completion of this course. Students will be charged an additional Studio Art Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): ARTS 4940 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ARTS 4990 Independent Study


    As approved by department chair and dean, and to be arranged. Students will be charged an additional Studio Art Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0

Asian Studies

  
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    ASN 1200 East Asian Ways to Well-Being


    This course explores East Asian ways to well-being by introducing students to the East Asian concepts of happiness and well-being, Confucian self-cultivation, the Taoist way of nourishing life, Zen Buddhist well-being, mindfulness meditation, Yoga and emotional well-being, Yin/Yang and achieving balance and harmony. Students will also learn about mind-body exercises such as Qi Gong, Taiji, and martial arts, the tea ceremony, flower arrangement, as well as collectivism, and the importance of maintaining strong relationships with others. Special attention will be paid to the East Asian holistic way of life and to the cultivation of an overall sense of well-being by approaching physical, social, and emotional challenges with balance, stability and connectedness. This course fulfills UCC Area One: Personal Well-being. Cross Listed Course(s): CHIN 1200  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 2000 Chinese Culture in The Global Context


    This course introduces essential elements of Chinese culture and explores its evolution and change from a global perspective. It discusses topics and concepts through which Chinese have identified their disctinctive cultural heritage, as well as global issues, ideas, and developments that linked China to other societies in Asia and the rest of the world. Cross Listed Course(s): CHIN 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 2001 Daily Life in Korea through Popular Culture


    The course explores various aspects of everyday life in South Korea through the lens of popular culture (K-pop, newspaper stories, arts, drama, film, etc.). It aims to develop practical knowledge which prepares students for cross-cultural encounters in private and public settings. Topics will include history, culture, media, gender, social class, war and trauma, family and kinship, education and career, food, work, lifestyle and consumption. Taught in English.

      Cross Listed Course(s): KORE 2000  
    Credits: 3.0

  
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    ASN 2010 Exploring Asia: Introduction To Asian Studies


    This multi-disciplinary course introduces students to the geography, history, culture, society, economics, and politics of India, China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia. The foundation for the Asian Studies program, the course is taken at the beginning of the course of study. This course is taught collectively by participating Asian Studies faculty members. (Portal to Asian Studies major and minor) Cross Listed Course(s): ANTH 2030 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 2020 Buddhism, Taoism, and East Asian Culture


    The course introduces students to key concepts of Buddhism, especially Zen Buddhism, and Taoism, and focus on their interaction with and contributions to East Asian culture. We will explore how Buddhist and Taoist concepts, experience, and practices have informed distinctive aspects of East Asian culture: fiction, poetry, painting, calligraphy, sculpture, architecture, gardening, tea ceremony, martial arts, diet, traditionall medicine, and everyday life. Furthermore, Buddhism and Taoism will be examined as an interconnecting theme that links various Asian cultures, and also connects the East and the West. Cross Listed Course(s): CHIN 2020 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 2040 East Asian Literature in Translation


    Discovering East Asia’s literature through selected canonical literary works in three major genres-poetry, fiction, and drama, students will experience these works and analyze literary elements and techniques while exploring social, cultural, political, and global influences that have shaped writing in East Asia. Taught in English. This is a Writing Intensive course. Cross Listed Course(s): CHIN 2040 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 2060 Japanese Culture in Global Context


    This course introduces essential elements of Japanese culture and explores its evolution and change from a global perspective. It discusses topics and concepts through which Japanese have identified their distictive cultural heritage, as well as global issues, ideas, and developments that linked Japan to other societies in Asia and the rest of the world. Cross Listed Course(s): JPAN 2060 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 2090 Disaster! Learning From Japan


    Catastrophes come in many forms– man-made and natural, unexpected and foreseeable. “Disaster!”conjures threat, fear, and trauma from events requiring collective action, both immediate and long-term.Matching student concerns and faculty expertise, each class will choose from among past and/or looming catastrophes for in-depth analysis and guidance for applied action. Students will develop action plans and strategies to prepare themselves and mobilize communities in our region to react to or avoid cataclysms through community-based learning experiences. Linking directly to collaborating overseas organizations and actors in Asia, students will engage with those whose civic energy and political and social action have faced challenges posed by such events. Implementing multi-disciplinary approaches and international outreach to victims, activists, NGOs, and governments in impacted areas via contemporary technologies, our students will practice thinking globally and acting locally to consider how to prevent and recover from catastrophes, whether man-made, natural, or ‘hybrid’. This course is Technology Intensive.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 2140 Asian and Western Metaphysics and Epistemology


    Deals with relationships between Asian and Western traditions in metaphysics and epistemology. Topics to be covered may include Taoism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Hinduism, objectivity, relativism, conceptual frameworks, pragmatism, meaning, ontology, substance, temporality, event, change, causation, Wittgenstein, Kant, personal identity, and attachment.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 2200 Chinese Conversation


    Develops students’ speaking and aural comprehension abilities in Chinese. Deals with various aspects of spoken Chinese and integrates them with multi-purpose oral communication skills. Activities such as situational dialogues and class discussion lead towards the development of speaking and listening skills sufficient to handle daily conversation. Taught in Chinese.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 2210 Japanese Conversation


    This course develops students’ speaking and aural comprehension abilities in Japanese. It deals with various aspects of spoken Japanese and integrates them into multi-purpose, oral communication skills. Main activities lead towards the development of speaking and listening skills sufficient to handle daily conversation. Other activities include the consideration of pronunciation and intonation, discussion, speech, interpretative reading, story telling, and dictation. These activites, involving a variety of topics regarding Japan, aim as well to deepen students’ understanding of Japanese culture and behavior. Prerequisite(s): JPAN 2100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 2220 Advanced Japanese


    The course develops the four skills of speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing with an increased emphasis on reading and writing at an advanced level. It fosters the development of vocabulary and an in-depth understanding of Japanese grammar through role play, conversation, and reading and writing exercises. Topics of discussion include diverse aspects of Japanese culture and society so as to enhance a greater understanding of Japan. Prerequisite(s): JPAN 2210   OR ASN 2210 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 2230 Advanced Japanese II


    This course is the continuation of ASN/JPAN 222 - Advanced Japanese I. It further develops a broad competency of the four skills: speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing, with an increased emphasis on the development of the functional abilities in authentic situations at a level substantially higher that that of ASN/JPAN 221. It fosters the development of vocabulary and an in-depth understanding of Japanese grammar through role play, conversation, and reading and writing exercises. These activities, involving a variety of topics regarding Japan, aim as well to deepen students’ understanding of Japanese culture and society. Prerequisite(s): ASN 2220  OR JPAN 2220  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 2270 Eastern Philosophy and Religion


    A comparative study of the principal past and present Eastern religions and of religious feelings and experience.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 2580 Asian American Experience


    An introduction to the histories of Americans of Asian ancestry from the late eighteenth century to the recent past, this course focuses on the experiences of peoples from China, Japan, Korea, the Phillipines,Southeast Asia, and South Asia. It explores patterns and similarities in experience, while also addressing differences stemming from nationality, class, gender, and colonial and postcolonial relationships to the United States. Within a broad chronological framework, the course approaches the Asian American experience thematically. Topics will include: the impact of U. S. imperialism on Asian migration; the significance of Asian labor in the development of the American West; anti-Asian movements and exclusion; community formation and ethnic identity; stereotypical images of Asian-Americans, from the Yellow Peril to the Model Minority; urban and suburban experiences; interaction with other ethnicities and social movements; and the forging of a pan-Asian movement in the 1960’s. Cross Listed Course(s): HIST 2580 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 2700 East Asian Civilization


    This course is a survey of East Asian civilization from its formative age to the present. The course focuses on the cultural heritage of Easy Asia, including Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism, and the diverse paths taken by three East Asian societies, China, Japan, and Korea, in their efforts to build modern nations. Special attention is given to interaction between the three societies that gave rise to a strong cultural bond in East Asia. (Portal to East Asia track) Cross Listed Course(s): HIST 2700 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 2720 Making Japanese Pop Culture


    This course examines contemporary Japanese popular culture from historical and theoretical perspectives. Learning how Japan was both impacted by and contributed to worldwide trends in culturaltransformation over the past several centuries requires critical analysis of the very notion of “globalization.” We analyze recent cultural materials to view Japanese culture as it is now, while examining classic examples of cultural adoption and adaptation from earlier periods of cultural creation in Japan with global impact. The objects and practices studied are wide-ranging, including wood-block prints, political and national symbols, architecture, advertising, visual and print media, literature, theatre,cinema, animé, manga, fashion, music, food, and art. The course centers on active student engagement with and manipulation of these cultural forms through active testing and calibration of cultural theory enhanced by technology. Prerequisite(s): One 1000-level History course. Cross Listed Course(s): HIST 2720  JPAN 2720 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 2800 Civilizations of South Asia


    A thematic introduction to the continuities and variations in the cultural history of the Indian subcontinent that examines the concept of civilization, including ideas of the past, forms of authority and resistance, the interaction of relgious traditions, the colonial encounter, and the rise of competing nationalisms. (Portal to South Asia track) Cross Listed Course(s): HIST 2800 , ANTH 2080  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 2900 Art of India,China and Japan


    This course presents a chronological survey of major art forms developed in India, China, and Japan from the Neolithic period to the early 20th century. It examines works such as architecture, sculpture, painting, ceramics, bronzes, jade carvings, woodblock prints, and garden design. Attention will be given to elements of style, subject matter, symbolism, spiritual content, and cultural history. Cross Listed Course(s): ARTH 2800 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3000 Popular Culture and Modernity in South Asia: Anthropological Insights


    This course is designed as an introduction to everyday life and popular culture in South Asia, a region that includes the nation-states of India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, and Maldives. The course examines key anthropological concepts and debates from South Asian material to inquire into the nature of modernity. Some of the themes that are addressed include changing institutions of family and kinship, castes and communities, urban spaces and global cities, religions in practice, the media revolution and youth, the challenges to modernity emerging from the violence of development, gender/sexuality, caste, globalization, and communalism.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3010 Contemporary Japan Culture


    This course examines contemporary Japanese culture and society. Drawing upon a contemporary cultural studies approach, it covers a variety of topics, such as Japanese family and social organizations, religion, basic cultural values, attitudes, and perceptions. Like many countries, Japan has been changing drastically in the past few decades. The course, therefore, invites students to look at the Japan of today from the basis of a general, traditional understanding of the country. Cross Listed Course(s): (Cross-listed: JPAN 3010 )
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3020 Japanese Literature and Film in Translation


    This course examines Japanese literature and film as world literature and global cinema. Through the study of major works we will seek to understand why Japan’s aesthetics, literary themes, and popular expressions have become integral to global culture today. We will trace the multiple cultural influences flowing to and from Japan, asking what has changed and what has continued over the centuries. Drawing upon novels, drama, poetry, and movies- ranging from classics like The Tale of Genji, Nobel-winning authors, and manga superstars to the “new classics” on celluloid and animé-the course traces the movement of Japanese literature from isolation on the edge of Asia to a position of cultural centrality in today’s world, while we examine the works on their merits. This is a writing intensive course. Cross Listed Course(s): ENG 3080  JPAN 3020  JPAN 3020 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3030 Literature of India in Translation


    A survey of the literature of South Asia, starting with selections from the Sanskrit epics and going on to romantic and devotional poetry and the rise of modern literary forms, with an emphasis on Hindi or another contemporary Indian language. The texts will be read in translation. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500   Cross Listed Course(s): HNDI 3030  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3040 Prehistory of The Far East


    The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the prehistory and paleoanthropology of the Far East (East and Southeast Asia, all inclusive). The course begins with a survey of the history of the theoretical and substantive discoveries which have influenced and/or continue to influence our understanding of the human evolution and behavior of the region. Cross Listed Course(s): ANTH 3040  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3050 Modern Chinese Literature in Translation


    This course introduces students to the literature of twentieth century China. It presents important historical and literary background, discusses literary trends and major authors, and analyzes major literary texts in different genres with emphasis on short stories. Cross Listed Course(s): CHIN 3010 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3060 Chinese Popular Culture


    This course examines the Chinese culture made and consumed by ordinary Chinese people, and analyzes how some of the critical Chinese ideological, political, social, and cultural factors are shaped in popular culture. We discuss popular belief systems, popular religions and religious activities, domestic and communal rituals and customs, various forms of popular performance, folk literature, and material culture. We also look at contemporary Chinese popular culture including arts, film, television, and music. These subjects are studied through both written and visual documentation. Taught in English. Cross Listed Course(s): CHIN 3020 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3070 Modern Indian Literature and Film


    An introduction to a selection of writings and cinema translated from various Indian languages into English. The course covers pre-independence texts as well as narratives of Partition and the voices of women. Students examine contemporary texts and films to gain a broader understanding of how tradition and modernity are embedded in South Asian literature. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500   Cross Listed Course(s): HNDI 3070 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3100 Globalization and Devel Anthro


    The last three decades have seen growing tensions between two powerful constructs that have framed knowledge of the “unevenness” of our world: development and globalization, the meanings of which are still debated. This course focuses on four major themes that recur in the debates surrounding globalization and development: poverty and inequality, individual states and transnational institutions, social and cultural movements on globalization’s impacts, global rights regime, and global health and environment. The broad approach taken in this course is “anthropological political economy,” which means that attention is paid to the ways in which three axes of social life - the cultural-ideological (meaning producing actions), the economic (commodity production and exchange), and the political (power struggles) come together to produce globalization and development as social phenomena. The course has a large focus on the continent of Asia, but also draws upon other regions of the world, including Euro-America, that shape the intensity, direction, and form of globalization. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1300  OR HIST 1020  OR POL 1100  OR SOC 1010  OR SOC 1020 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3160 Daily Life in Japan


    Examining Japanese life through direct experience and classroom study in Japan and/or the United States, this course explores home, community, religion, business practices, education, and the arts, possibly augmented by on-site visits and interaction with visitors specializing in Japan’s regional cultures, dance, song, calligraphy, cuisine, and other elements of contemporary Japan. Cross Listed Course(s): JPAN 3160 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3200 Contemporary Korean Culture in The Global Era


    The course examines the contemporary culture of South Korea. Interdisciplinary in nature, the course examines factors affecting its economic prosperity and analyzes contemporary Korean ways of life, attitudes and behavior in a wide variety of cultural domains such as TV dramas, films, music, arts, sports and food. The course probes how contemporary Korean culture has become popular in many parts of the world (a phenomenon known as the Korean Wave or hallyu), and investigates how it perceived by Koreans and non-Koreans. (No knowledge of Korean language or culture is presumed.) Cross Listed Course(s): KORE 3200 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3210 Korean Culture and Communication


    This course introduces Korean culture and culture-based Korean communication styles. Drawing upon the interdisciplinary work of cultural studies and pragmatics, it deals with selected topics in Korean culture, thoughts, and practices, and examines the intricacies of communication as cultural practices informed by social parameters. Greater emphasis will be devoted to contemporary societal patterns and developments in South Korea, but traditional society will be discussed in some depth. No knowledge of Korean language or culture is presumed. Cross Listed Course(s): KORE 3210 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3250 Women in Modern Japanese Literature


    This course examines the portrayal of women, gender, and sexuality in contemporary Japanese culture and society. Drawing on literary genres from the traditional to manga art and animé creations, the course explores such universal topics as notions of the self, national and gender identity, colonialism, war and its atomic aftermath, sexual liberation, globalism, and aging in Japan’s modern period (1868 - present). What Japanese writers have learned from and transmitted to Japan’s regional neighbors and world literature and how the concerns of the global women’s movement have manifested themselves in Japanese literature are major focii of discussion. All readings will be in English. Cross Listed Course(s): JPAN 3250  , WGS 3260 , ENG 3580 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3270 Culture of Japanese Lit


    This course examines the rich and varied literature of Japan through a variety of genres: myth and poetry derived from oral traditions in ancient times; classical Court masterpieces like The Tale of Genji; the world of samurai ballads, Noh theater and tea ceremony; Buddhist contemplations; haiku poetry; and the bawdy “Floating World” of Kabuki, townsmen, and geisha. The culture of producing and consuming “literature” is explored together with how these forms influence world literature and global culture today. All readings will be in English. Cross Listed Course(s): JPAN 3270 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3310 The Geography of Asia


    This course focuses on a geographical overview and analysis of Asia as a major world region. It examines the physical, environmental, and human (historical, social, cultural, economic, demographic, and political) factors and processes that have shaped and continue to shape the region’s geography, and define its distinctiveness from other world regions. The course explores the nature, dynamics, and dimensions of the resources, population, urbanization, economic, social, cultural, and political relationships between Asia and other regions and addresses the contemporary concerns and issues in the process of globalization. Prerequisite(s): GEO 1500  Cross Listed Course(s): GEO 3310 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3360 Politics of Asia


    itics of Asia, within a comparative perspective. Divergent colonial legacies, ideologies, and cultural traditions will be examined. The course will focus on Asia’s post-Cold War developments, particularly the challenge posed by the emergence of India and China and their role in shaping international discourse on democracy, development, global finance, climate change, environment, security, international law and human rights. Cross Listed Course(s): POL 3360 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3380 Media in Asia


    A case study approach to an in-depth analysis of theories and issues relating to media globalization, regionalization, localization, national development, and international relations in Asia. Cross Listed Course(s): COMM 3380 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3400 Orientalisms:Theories and Practice


    This course provides an introduction to the principal theories of Orientalism. It offers students the opportunity to examine how these theories translate into the literary practices of various Western (principally British, French, and U.S.) authors and poets of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, as well as in contemporary popular culture.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3410 Asian and American Cross-Cultural Communication


    A comparative and contrastive study of interpersonal communication in East Asia (i.e. China, Japan, and Korea) and the United States. The course familiarizes students with the foundations of cross-cultural pragmatics, and examines the differences and similarities in cognitive, verbal, and behavioral patterns among East Asians and between East Asians and Americans. Cross Listed Course(s): COMM 3410 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3490 Southeast Asia in World Politics


    Southeast Asia is a region of great diversity encompassing democracies and dictatorships; a city-state and a vast archipelago; rich states and poor; the world’s most populous Muslim country, one of the largest Catholic nations, and one of the newest nations (East Timor); and ancient civilizations. It is also a region of great economic and strategic importance: the scene of fast-growing states and of the United States’ longest war. This course examines colonial legacies, nationalist and revolutionary movements, and big power interests in order to understand the foreign policy of regional states and the role of external powers. Prerequisite(s): POL 1100  OR POL 1200  Cross Listed Course(s): POL 3490 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3500 Buddhist Philosophy


    This course examines various philosophies within the Buddhist tradition, such as the atomists, the idealists, and the schools that claim that ultimate reality is beyond the scope of words. The role of meditation and morality in relation to these schools is also discussed. The course introduces students to Buddhist philosophy as it evolved in India, China, Korea, Japan, and Tibet. The course ends with an examination of contemporary Buddhism. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 1100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3510 Asian American Literature


    A course introducing modern and contemporary Asian American literature, including oral histories, novels, poetry, and memoir. These works are examined within their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Authors may include Ahmed Ali, Premchand, R. K. Narayan, Rabindranath Tagore, Salman Rushdie, Anita Desai, and Arundhati Roy. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500  Cross Listed Course(s): ENG 3530 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3530 Modern Indian Literature


    An examination of the significant works of literature of India, from the colonial period to the present. Course may focus on modern or contemporary authors, including the Indian Diaspora, and will offer an opportunity to examine these works within their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Authors may include Ahmed Ali, Premchand, R. K. Narayan, Rabindranath Tagore, Salman Rushdie, Anita Desai, and Arundhati Roy. Prerequisite(s): (ENG 1500  AND ENG 2000 ) OR ASN 2010  Cross Listed Course(s): ENG 3530 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3550 Women and Gender in South Asia


    This course examines the history of women and gender in modern South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka) during the ninteenth and twentieth centuries. We analyze the historical processes that transformed women’s lives, and consider how women themselves negotiated or subverted these processes in their own interest. Major themes and topics include: the transformation of gender through colonialism and nationalism, the emergence of women’s movements, women’s labor and globalization, and gender in the South Asian Diaspora. Prerequisite(s): WGS 1100  OR WGS 1500  OR AWS 1500  Cross Listed Course(s): HIST 3560 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3575 History of The Caucasus To 1750 CE


    This course gives the student a broad knowledge of the pre-modern history of the Caucasus to 1750 CE. On the hinge between Europe and Asia, the Caucasian highlands (encompassing all, or parts of, the modern nations of Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Turkey, Iran and Russia) have long been a socially, politically and religiously complex region, and remain of vital geopolitical importance today. The diverse peoples of the ancient and medieval Caucasus lived at the intersection between the cultures of the Mediterranean, the Near East, Eastern Europe and the steppes of Central Eurasia. The dynamic history of the region and its peoples reflects Caucasia’s place as a vital center of exchange and conflict, and as a place of remarkable local cultural innovation. Cross Listed Course(s): HIST 3575 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3580 Asian American Women: Gender Transformations


    This course focuses on the contemporary Asian immigration to the United States and examines its impact on immigrant women’s roles in the workplace, family, and the community. It addresses the importance of gender in immigrant adaptation and identity formation not only among the immigrants but also among their U.S. - born children. Discussion includes the ways in which ethnicity, class, age, citizenship, and sexuality intersect to shape various experiences of Asian American women in the context of work and life. The complexity of ethnicity, including multiracial/multiethnic identities and the phenomenon of intermarriages, is explored in connection with gender relations in the contemporary Asian American communities. Prerequisite(s): WGS 1100  OR WGS 1500  OR AACS 1500 OR AACS 1550 OR ENG 1100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3590 Women and Islam


    This course examines women and gender in Islamic societies in the Middle East, North Africa, and Asia. Beginning with an overview of pre-modern history, the course focuses on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics include: women’s roles in production and reproduction, gender ideologies and representations of Muslim women, and the development of feminist, nationalist, and Islamist movements. Throughout the course, we also interrogate our own categories of analysis. What makes a particular society “Islamic” and is this the best way to define our topic? How does our position in the U.S. shape our understanding of Muslim women? How do culture and politics come together to shape women’s roles and rights? Prerequisite(s): WGS 1100  OR WGS 1500  OR AACS 1500 Cross Listed Course(s): WS 3590, HIST 3590 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3610 Modern Japan


    This course examines Japan’s spectacular rise to world power and a position of economic prominence and significance in today’s global society. The social, economic, cultural and political consequences of industrialization and “Westernization” receive special attention since they link Japan to similar processes in play in Asia, Europe, and the Americas over the past two centuries. Japan’s experience with continental empire, war, defeat, and recovery will be treated from many perspectives, including the role played by memory in shaping Japan’s international posture in the postwar era. Literature, cultural artifacts, and films will be key resources used to explore the worldviews of Japanese people and the popularized images of Japanese culture in other regions of the world including America Cross Listed Course(s): HIST 3610 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3620 Making Japanese Popular Culture


    This course examines contemporary Japanese popular culture from historical and theoretical perspectives. Learning how Japan was both impacted by and contributed to worldwide trends in cultural transformation over the past several centuries requires critical analysis of the very notion of “globalization.” We analyze recent cultural materials to view Japanese culture as it is now, while examining classic examples of cultural adoption and adaptation from earlier periods of cultural creation in Japan with global impact. The objects and practices studied are wide-ranging, including wood-block prints, political and national symbols, architecture, advertising, visual and print media, literature, theatre, cinema, animé, manga, fashion, music, food, and art. The course centers on active student engagement with and manipulation of these cultural forms through active testing and calibration of cultural theory enhanced by technology. Prerequisite(s): HIST 1010  or HIST 1020  or HIST 1030  or HIST 1040  or HIST 1050  Cross Listed Course(s): HIST 3620  JPAN 3620 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3640 Japanese History Through Cinema


    Japan has had one of the world’s strongest and most creative cinema traditions, dating back practically to the invention of motion pictures. It has produced some of the greatest directors, actors, and themes in cinema history and its influence in contemporary culture outside of Japan, especially through its anime off-shoots, are now standard fare worldwide. This course examines what Japanese cinema can teach us about the making of contemporary Japan. It is dedicated to a special theme that engages the class in an historical quest to show how we can better understand the making of modern Japan through the history of its cinema. Cross Listed Course(s): HIST 3640 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3680 Women and War


    This course looks at how war and the preparation for war have affected the lives, hopes, and images of women around the world. It examines roles of women in war, military service, and militarism in societal development in world history primarily since the eighteenth century with these questions central: What roles have women played in war? Are women victims of conflict alone or are they active participants as well? And how has war helped shape female roles, gender stereotypes, and national mythologies? A broad comparative framework, exploring “Western” and “non-Western” societal experience and analytical approaches, is adopted throughout. Prerequisite(s): AACS 1500 OR AACS 1550 OR WGS 1100  OR WGS 1500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3700 Traditional China


    This course examines Chinese history and its broad, global implications from their earliest times to approximately 1800.  Focal points include the origins and evolution of China’s centralized bureaucratic system; the evolution of Confucianism, Taoism and Chinese Buddhism; interaction with foreign and minority cultures; political-economic relations including trade with distant partners; and cultural achievements. Throughout the course, developments in China proper are examined comparatively in global context.
    AREA 6: Global Awareness

      Prerequisite(s): HIST 1030 ,HIST 1040 ,HIST 1050   Cross Listed Course(s): HIST 3700  
    Credits: 3.0

  
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    ASN 3730 Korean History


    Surveys Korean history from the earliest times through the twentieth century. For the traditional periods, the foci are the evolution of Korean polity, social and economic structure, cultural life, and Korea’s relationship with its neighbors in East Asia. For the modern era, the course examines the opening of the country in the nineteenth cetury, Japan’s colonization, the nationalist movement, the Korean War, and the political and economic development in both South Korea and North Korea in the latter part of the twentieth century. Prerequisite(s): HIST 1010 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3750 Contemporary Chinese Cinema


    This course examines Chinese cinema since the “Fifth Generation” of Chinese filmmakers in the mid-1980s. In contemporary China, cinema has become an important artistic art form reflecting diverse social dynamics and drastic changes in mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. The course develops a better understanding of changing Chinese culture by analyzing cinematic texts and the new development in the era of globalization. Although focus is placed on the works from mainland China, films from Taiwan and Hong Kong are also discussed. Taught in English. Cross Listed Course(s): CHIN 3750 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3760 Life/Writings Indigenous Women


    This course is designed to expose students to the richness of the culture and literatures of women from indigenous communities, and the systematic opression that they have been/are subject to due to race, caste, gender, and class. The communities include Native American, Australian Aborigine, and Dalit women from India. The traditional and historic status of these women in relation to their social, economic, and political status today is discussed. These silenced voices of women are presented and analyzed in the forms of individual stories, memoirs, songs, poetry, and fiction of the women from these three communities. Significant texts in translated literary forms and works are used as primary sources. This course involves reading literary works and dealing with them via lecture, class discussions, small group discussions, and writing about significant aspects of the literatures. Prerequisite(s): (WGS 1100  OR WGS 1500  OR AACS 1500 OR AACS 1550) AND ENG 1100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3780 Mughal India


    South Asia under Mughal dominance from c. 1500 to the late eighteenth century: the course examines the social, cultural, economic, and political history of early modern India as well as the significance of European expansion. Prerequisite(s): HIST 1020  OR ASN 2010 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3800 Indo-Tibetan Buddhism


    An introduction to “generic” Buddhist philosophy as the basis for Tibetan Buddhist philosophy. Emphasis is placed on the four noble truths, the eightfold path, the four immeasurables, and the virutes. The Early Schools and the Mahayana and Vajrayana paths are explained, as well as the major philosophical positions in Buddhism. Students are introduced to major teachers in the Tibetan tradition as well as to modern Tibetan thinkers. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 1100  Cross Listed Course(s): PHIL 3800 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3910 Population and Development in Asia


    This course introduces students to an overview of (1) the population growth and population problems in major Asian countries, such as China and India; (2) the relationship between population and socioeconomic development; and (3) the relationship between Asian development and the world (Non-Western course) Cross Listed Course(s): SOC 3910 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 3940 Modern India


    An introduction to the history of South Asia under British rule and the postcolonial nation states that arose by the second half of the twentieth century. Prerequisite(s): HIST 1010  Cross Listed Course(s): HIST 3940 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 4000 Seminar: Japanese Literature and Culture


    This seminar is designed to expand students’ knowledge of Japanese literature and culture through reading and discussion of major works in Japanese. It explores trends and issues in literary scholarship, introduces research methodology in the field, and deepens understanding of the cultural contexts of literary works. The seminar requires students to read critically and to analyze and write about Japanese literature and culture using both Japanese and Western critical approaches. This course is required of all majors who will seek teacher certification in Japanese. May be used to fulfill the ASN 4800 Senior Seminar requirement. Taught primarily in Japanese. Prerequisite(s): ASN 2700  AND JPAN 2110 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 4680 Ghandi and Nonviolence


    The course studies the life, career, and philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi in relation to the political and social development of modern India and in comparison to other anti-colonial resistance movements. The course also considers different approaches to historical understanding and representation including biography, autobiography, psychohistory, and subaltern studies, as well as political and intellectual narrative and analysis. Cross Listed Course(s): HIST 4680 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 4800 Asian Studies Senior Seminar


    This senior capstone course allows students to conduct in-depth research and writing on Asia. Seminar topics vary according to the discipline of the Asian Studies faculty member teaching the particular seminar. Students are required to read scholarly literature in the particular field covered in the seminar and to use their knowledge of Asia acquired in this course and in core and elective courses in order to produce a senior seminar paper. Students are required to present their research paper in class. Students are encouraged to present their findings in public venues, such as Asian Studies student-faculty colloquia or Asian Studies conferences. Capstone for Asian Studies major. Prerequisite(s): ASN 2010  AND (ASN 2700  OR ASN 2800 ) Cross Listed Course(s): With other 400-level courses approved for Asian Studies major.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ASN 4990 Independent Study


    An independent project as approved and to be arranged through the department.  1 - 6 credits
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0
  
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    CHIN 1200 East Asian Ways to Well-Being


    This course explores East Asian ways to well-being by introducing students to the East Asian concepts of happiness and well-being, Confucian self-cultivation, the Taoist way of nourishing life, Zen Buddhist well-being, mindfulness meditation, Yoga and emotional well-being, Yin/Yang and achieving balance and harmony. Students will also learn about mind-body exercises such as Qi Gong, Taiji, and martial arts, the tea ceremony, flower arrangement, as well as collectivism, and the importance of maintaining strong relationships with others. Special attention will be paid to the East Asian holistic way of life and to the cultivation of an overall sense of well-being by approaching physical, social, and emotional challenges with balance, stability and connectedness. This course  fulfills a UCC Area One: Personal Well-being.  Cross Listed Course(s): ASN 1200  
    Credits: 3.0

Athletic Training

  
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    ATEP 1500 Introduction To Athletic Training


    This introductory course explores the history,evolution, and current practice of the athletic training profession. The course also introduces basic health care practices and knowledge, such as infection control, medical terminology, and awareness of related health care professions as they relate to the sports medicine team concept. Students must earn C- or better in the course to continue taking courses in the Athletic Training major.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ATEP 2000 Sports Emergency Care


    This course covers theory and practice of the recognition and management of common medical and trauma emegencies in sports. In this course, emphasis on practical application of emergency interventions will be stressed. Students who successfully complete this course will be eligible for both cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency medical responder (EMR) certification. ` Students will be charged an additional Kinesiology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): Athletic Training Majors only and with permission of Department Chair.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ATEP 2400 Prevention and Care of Injury and Illness in Athletic Training


    This class presents information on prevention, recognition, and immediate as well as follow-up care for illnesses and injuries, along with other athletic training and sports medicine related topics. This laboratory portion of the class includes clinical, hands-on aspects of the athletic training field. Students will be charged an additional Kinesiology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): ATEP 1500  , ATEP 2000  , BIO 1120  
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    ATEP 2500 Clinical Experience in Athletic Training I


    This is a beginning level class in the athletic training major. This course is designed to give the sophomore student athletic training clinical experience working with William Paterson athletic teams. The course is designed to instruct the student in the application of beginning clinical principles and techniques in the traditional athletic training setting under the supervision of an approved clinical instructor certified athletic trainer. Also, this course is the students’ first research and writing intensive course in the athletic training discipline. Students will be charged an additional Malpractice Liab Ins Fee and Kinesiology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. 2 credits Prerequisite(s): ATEP 2400  and admission to the ATEP professional preparation phase;
    Credits: 2.0
  
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    ATEP 2600 Assessment of Extremities


    This class is a study of the theory and techniques of assessing upper and lower extremity injuries that occur to athletes. Upon successful completion of the class, the students are able to evaluate an injured athlete using proper techniques and special tests. Students are able to interpret the results of tests used in the evaluation to come to a conclusion regarding an athlete’s injury. Prerequisite(s): ATEP 2400  BIO 1130  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ATEP 2700 Athletic Training Modalities


    Study involves theory and technique in the selection and application of physical agents and therapeutic modalities. Included are physics, physiology, and actions of heat, cold, light, acostic, and electromagnetic agents for patient care. Included is relation of modality use to assessment and therapeutic exercise. The course includes laboratory instruction in application of modalities in sports medicine. Prerequisite(s): ATEP 2400 , BIO 1130  and Admission to the ATEP Professional Preparation Phase
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ATEP 3500 Clinical Experience in Athletic Training II


    This is an intermediate level class in the athletic training major. This course is designed to give the junior student athletic training clinical experience working with William Paterson athletic teams. The course is designed to instruct the student in the application of intermediate clinical principles and techniques in the traditional athletic training setting under the supervision of an approved clinical instructor certified athletic trainer. Students will be charged an additional Malpractice Liab Ins Fee and Kinesiology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): ATEP 2500  AND ATEP 2600  AND ATEP 2700 
    Credits: 2.0
  
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    ATEP 3600 Assessment of Core Body


    This class is a study of the theory and techniques of assessing core body injuries and illnesses that occur to athletes. Upon successful completion of the class, the student is able to evaluate an injured or ill athlete using the proper techniques and special tests. The student is able to interpret the results of tests used in the evalution to come to a conclusion regarding an athlete’s injury or illness. Prerequisite(s): ATEP 2500  AND ATEP 2600  AND ATEP 2700 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ATEP 3700 Therapeutic Exercise


    This course provdies the physiological rationale for appropriate and effective use of therapeutic exercise in the rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Included in this course are the basic components of designing and implementing rehabilitation programs. In addition, selected programs for rehabilitation are presented with a review of current research. Students take part in laboratory sessions where they learn and demonstrate practical rehabilitation applications. Prerequisite(s): ATEP 2500  AND ATEP 2600  AND ATEP 2700 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ATEP 3750 Clincial Experience in Athletic Training III


    This upper level class in the athletic training major is designed to give the junior student a practical athletic training experience in a high school setting and instruct the student in the application of advanced clinical principles and techniques in the traditional athletic training setting under the supervision of a clinical instructor. Prerequisite(s): ATEP 3500  AND ATEP 3600  AND ATEP 3700  
    Credits: 2.0
  
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    ATEP 3800 Organization and Administration in Athletic Training


    This class is a study in advanced topics in athletic training. Upon successful completion of the class, the student should be able to identify, establish and operate the various components of athletic training administration. The student should also be able to define, assess, and provide care for medical conditions as covered in the course. Prerequisite(s): ATEP 3500  AND ATEP 3600  AND ATEP 3700 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ATEP 4500 Clincial Experience in Athletic Training IV


    This is an upper level class in the athletic training major. This course is designed to give the senior athletic training student clinical experience in athletic training. The course is designed to instruct the student in practical application of advanced clinical principles and techniques in an athletic training practice setting under the supervision of a preceptor. The course also reexamines upper level athletic training education topics in preparation for the Board of Certification examination and the students’ future careers as athletic trainers. This course is the students’ second writing intensive course in the athletic training discipline. Students will be charged an additional Malpractice Liab Ins Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): ATEP 3750  and ATEP 3800  
    Credits: 2.0
  
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    ATEP 4600 General Medicine and Pharmacology in Athletic Training


    This class is a study of general medicine and pharmacology topics as they relate to athletic training. Primary topics that will discussed are illness and disease, medical terminology, and pharmaceutical agents including therapeutic medications. Prerequisite(s): ATEP 3800 
    Credits: 1.0
  
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    ATEP 4750 Clinical Experience in Athletic Training V


    This class is a capstone course for senior, graduating students in the athletic training education program. In this course, students will summarize and draw together their didactic and clinical experience education in preparation for the athletic training Board of Certification examination. Students will explore subjects and current issues germane to the field of athletic training, complete clinical experience rotations with William Paterson University (WPU) athletic teams under the supervision of athletic training preceptors, perform clinical experience rotations under the supervision of various affiliated medical and allied health care professional preceptors, attend medical and allied health care related in-services, participate as a volunteer for community services activities related to athletic training, and observe orthopedic surgical procedures. This course will not only assist students to prepare for a profession in athletic training, but also to prepare them for an active role in community and civic engagement. Prerequisite(s): ATEP 4500 
    Credits: 2.0
  
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    ATEP 4990 Independent Study


    An independent project as approved and to be arranged through the department.
    Credits: 1.00-6.00

Africana World Studies

  
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    AWS 1010 African, African American, and African Caribbean Dance


    Preparation of the body through conditioning exercises and dance sequences to perform ethnic dance forms from Africa, the Caribbean, and the United States. Students may choose a field trip to a professional performance or examine dance forms more closely by composing a dance sequence, using ethnic materials from class.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 1100 Basic Swahili I


    Presents the fundamentals of Swahili. Simple grammatical construction and forms, building of broad and commonly used vocabulary and idiomatic expression, developing reading, writing, and conversational skills with emphasis on the grammatical principles and their application to the language. Cross Listed Course(s): AACS 110 AWS 110
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 1110 Basic Swahili II


    Emphasizes primarily conversation and basic grammar. The class meets formally twice a week. In addition, students work with tapes in the language lab. The approach is concentrated on phonology, morphology, and vocabulary. Prerequisite(s): AWS 1100  OR AWS 2060  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 1150 Gospel Choir


    Discusses gospel music in America from its origins to the present, and its relevance and role in the community. Focus is on gospel concepts, melodic development, memorization, improvisation, and analysis. A companion (practice side) of this course is The Gospel Ensemble.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 1160 African Music I


    Introduces students to African music by systematically focusing on its diverse geographical areas, its various forms, styles, and musical instruments. The African musical experience is explored within the context of the ecological and environmental paradigm as major factors that impact on traditional musical instrument utilization, particularly in the four major musiological groupings, i.e. (1) idiophones, (2) membranophones, (3) chordophones, and (4) aerophones. Within a sociocultural and historical context, the customs, traditions, role, and function of music are examined in various geographical areas and in African society in general.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 1170 African Music II


    Introduces students to the music of Morocco, otherwise known as Moorish music. Sociocultural, historical, and musiological approaches are incorporated to explore the music, its origins, evolution, and development in North Africa, the various processes and outgrowth of cross-cultural synthesis and transmutation of core North African musical traditions in Al-Andalus (Spain 711-1492 A.D.). The course provides a systematic study of the Andalusian Metric System in Spain, musicians, musical instruments, form, structure, style, and cultural and technical aspects of the correlations between music and core literary North African traditions and their contributions to world culture.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 1180 African Political Thought


    This course traces the historical evolution of African political thought, emphasizing the philosophical, socio-economic, intellectual and other circumstances that have shaped particular strands of political philosophy amongst thinkers of African origin. This course will help students compare and contrast the way African thought approaches the questions of human existence and those who have different historical and material experiences. Cross Listed Course(s): POL 1160  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 1300 African American Art


    A survey of African American art from the late 18th century to the contemporary period, this course explores the artistic expressions and contributions of Afrricans of African descent in the visual arts, and includes works in painting, sculpture, graphic arts, photography and installation. The course covers various eras including the colonical era, Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, the New Negro Movement, the Black Arts Movement, and self-taught Folk Art with emphasis on identity formation in the cultural, social and political contexts. Cross Listed Course(s): Crosslisted with ARTH 1300 .
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 1500 Racism and Sexism in US


    A study of the historical, philosophical, social, and political treatments and interpretation of blacks and women in the United States. Selected topics include media stereotypes of blacks and women, definitions and rationalizations of racism and sexism, the role that blacks and women have played in U.S. history, the relationship between the nineteenth-century abolitionist movement and the early feminist movement, and the relationship between the 1960s civil rights movement and the women’s liberation movement.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 1510 Introduction Africana World Literature


    This course introduces students to a culture-sensitive reading and appreciation of literature. Using the global literatures of African peoples as primary core traditions, the course provides critical, technical, and historical approaches to a cross-cultural exploration of literature and the intertextual relationships between African-world texts and literary works from non-African traditions. Selected texts cover various genres, time periods, racial-ethnic categories, and geographical areas of the world.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 1550 Justice and Racism


    Analysis of racism in the formulation and implementation of the law, in the courts, in penal institutions, and in the police department. Attention is also given to the historical and sociocultural problems associated with the attainment of social justice for African-Americans.
    Credits: 3.0
 

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