Jul 05, 2020  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog

Courses


 

English

  
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    ENG 3060 Literature of Western Europe: Renaissance Through Modern


    Surveys the Western canon drawn from continental European literature of the last 300 years, beginning with neoclassical writers like Moliere, Racine, Marie de LaFayette, and Voltaire; continuing with romantic, realistic, naturalistic, and symbolist writers like Rousseau, Goethe, Hugo, Pushkin, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Baudelaire, Tolstoy, and Ibsen; and concluding with modernist writers like Pirandello, Proust, Mann, Rilke, Kafka, Lorca, and Camus. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3070 Latino Cultural Studies


    This course offers a comparative, analytical, and critical perspective on the popular culture of the Latino population in the United States. It examines the interplay of history, belief systems, cultural assumptions, traditions, and worldviews as expressed in the literature, film, music, television, and cultural artifacts produced by and for the twenty-two million Latinos currently living in this country. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3080 Japanese Film and Literature in Translation


    This course examines Japanese literature and film as world literature and global cinema. Through the study of major works we will seek to understand why Japan’s aesthetics, literary themes, and popular expressions have become integral to global culture today. We will trace the multiple cultural influences flowing to and from Japan, asking what has changed and what has continued over the centuries. Drawing upon novels, drama, poetry, and movies- ranging from classics like The Tale of Genji, Nobel-winning authors, and manga superstars to the “new classics” on celluloid and animé-the course traces the movement of Japanese literature from isolation on the edge of Asia to a position of cultural centrality in today’s world, while we examine the works on their merits. This is a writing intensive course.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3090 Book and Magazine Editing


    Develops skills in the basic techniques of editing books and magazines. Designed for those interested in a publishing career and for the general reader and writer. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3100 Elizbeth/Jacobean Drama


    A critical reading of Shakespeare’s forerunners and contemporaries in drama: Kyd, Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and others. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3110 Literature Eng Renaissance


    Selected English prose and poetry of the sixteenth century. Special attention is given to the early English humanist theories of education, eloquence, and language and their literary influence, and important developments in English poetry. The focus is on figures such as Thomas More, Philip Sidney, and Edmund Spenser. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3120 Donne/Jonson/Contmporary


    A study of several representative works of the first sixty years of the seventeenth century in Britain, with particular emphasis on John Donne and Ben Jonson. Attention is paid to the various literary forms and genres of the seventeenth century, the cultural and intellectual context in which authors were writing, and the authors’ influences on one another. In addition to Donne and Jonson, selected authors may include Webster, Wroth, Bacon, Hobbes, Herbert, Marvell, Herrick, Philips, and Milton. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3130 Literature British Empire 1660-1750


    This course explores the literature of the Restoration and of the early 18th century in England, Scotland, and Wales, with attention to the writing of the newly developing British empire, especially the literature of the Atlantic. Writers studied include Behn, Defoe, Locke, Selina Hastings, Swift, and others. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3140 Age of Johnson


    The course focuses on the decline of Augustanism and the rise of Romanticism (1750-98). Students read imaginative, critical, and political works by writers such as Johnson, Boswell, Goldsmith, Radcliffe, Burke, Burney, Inchwalk, Sterne, Burns, and Wollstonecraft. The class examines issues such as sentimentalism, manners, revolution, and the emergence of the novel. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3150 Romantic Movement in England


    Critically studies Romantic poetry and prose within the contexts of literary and cultural history. The course addresses the works’ thematic content and form as well as issues such as gender, class, nation, ethnicity, religion, and education. Authors may include Blake, Wollstonecraft, Baillie, Burns, Wordsworth (William and Dorothy), Coleridge, Scott, Byron, Shelley (Percy and Mary), Hemans, Keats, and the Brontes. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3160 Literature Culture Victorians


    This course examines the poetry, fiction, nonfictional prose, and drama of the Victorians in their social context. Readings may include such poets as Tennyson, the Brownings, and Arnold; novelists such as Eliot, Stoker, Dickens, and Hardy; nonfictional writers such as Carlyle, Mill, and Pater; and playwrights including Shaw and Wilde. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3170 Modern American Literature


    Introduces major movements like modernism, social protest, regionalism, and confessional writing that shaped American fiction, poetry, and drama in the period from the end of World War I to the end of the Vietnam War. Writers may include Frost, Eliot, Hughes, Millay, Ginsberg, and Plath; Glaspell, O’Neill, Hellman, and Albee; Cather, Fitzgerald, Parker, Hemingway, Faulkner, Hurston, Steinbeck, O’Connor, Kerouac, and Barthelme. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3180 Modern British Literature


    Introduces the major developments in modern British literature, emphasizing the development of modernism in Joyce, Eliot, and Woolf; drama from Shaw through Beckett to Osborne and Stoppard; the poetry of Yeats and Auden, Thomas and Larkin; the fiction of Lawrence, Greene, Orwell, and Lessing; and the impact of the literatures of the Empire in Ireland, Africa, the Caribbean, and India/Pakistan. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3190 Modern British and American Poetry


    Study of selected British and American poets of the twentieth century such as W.B. Yeats, Robert Frost, Ezra Pound, H.D., T.S. Eliot, D.H. Lawrence, William Carlos Williams, Edna St. Vincent Millay, W.H. Auden, Stevie Smith, Philip Larkin, Elizabeth Bishop, Langston Hughes, Allen Ginsberg, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, and Seamus Heaney. Literary movements and social conflicts that distinguish the period are discussed. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3200 Novel:Defoe-Austen


    Critically studies the origins of the English novel in the eighteenth century, with attention to the ways it emerged out of contemporary genres such as travel narrative, letters, memoirs, scandal chronicles, and journalism. Authors may include Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Walpole, Fielding, Sterne, Burney, Radcliffe, Edgeworth, and Austen. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3210 The English Novel: Dickens To Hardy


    Critically studies novels of the Victorian period and their contexts - social, scientific, political, religious, domestic, economic, historical, and literary. Selected authors may include Dickens, Eliot, Thackeray, Trollope, the Brontes, and Hardy. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3220 19th Century European Novel


    Studies major continental European fiction against the social, political, and intellectual milieu of nineteenth-century Europe. Within the framework of the romantic, realistic, and the naturalistic literary movements, the novelists may include Lermontov, Manzoni, Balzac, Turgenev, Sand, Stendhal, Hugo, Flaubert, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, and Zola. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3230 20th Century European Fiction


    Studies major continental European fiction against the social, political, and intellectual milieu of twentieth-century Europe. Within the framework of the modernist and postmodernist literary movements, authors may include Gide, Colette, Proust, Dinesen, Rilke, Malraux, Camus, Robbe-Grillet, Sarraute, Duras, Celine, Nin, Bernanos, Unamuno, Mann, Remarque, Kafka, Boll, Aichinger, Roch, Grass, Kunera, Calvino, Svevo, Moravia, Silone, Nabokov, Solzhenitsyn, and Babel. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3240 Modern Biography and Autobiography


    Includes modern autobiographies and biographies of writers, artists, musicians, and figures from history and popular culture. A study of how autobiography and biography function as art forms and reflect the political and cultural contexts of their times. An exploration of the process of writing autobiography and biography. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3250 Literature Across the Americas


    The course will focus on fiction, poetry and drama produced in North, Central and South America, offering comparative readings of selected texts. Writers may include Munro, Atwood, Ondaatje, Hurston, Faulkner, Hemingway, Borges, Garcia Marquez, Clarice Lispector, Graciliano Ramos, Jorge Amado, George Lamming, Jamaica Kincaid. Satisfies survey requirement; pre-1900 requirement. ENG 1100  and ENG 1500 .
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3260 Native American Literature


    A study of the work of contemporary Native American writers including Louise Erdrich, Leslie Marmon Silko, N. Scott Momaday, and Sherman Alexi. The course focuses on novels but may include poetry, short fiction, and some works that defy classification. Themes such as orality, myth, community, storytelling, and genre boundaries are examined. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3270 Literature and Environment


    The course will familiarize students with the established canons of nature writing and environmental literature. Using an ecocritical lens, students will study the vital relationship between literature and environmental values that exists even in literature not directly identified with environmental traditions. In addition, students will engage in one or more of the following activities: research and analysis of strategies for environmental activism; critical interaction with local (urban, suburban, and/or rural) ecosystems in order to investigate the concept of “environment”; and active participation in environmental activism. In these ways, the course may prove beneficial not only to understanding our regional, national, and global environmental crises, but for resolving them, too. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500  & Complete Area 4 of UCC requirements
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3300 Critical Writing I


    This course in nonfiction writing covers a variety of forms and genres, such as the academic paper, the book or film review, the personal essay, and the editorial. Students produce frequent expository and/or analytical writings on selected cultural topics. While learning to edit their own as well as others’ work, students develop skills in writing-as-process, grammar and style, argument, persuasion, and research. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3320 Advanced Creative Writing


    Designed for students who have successfully completed one semester of creative writing and want additional specialized instruction in a variety of genres. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2310 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3330 Critical Writing II


    This writing-intensive course covers advanced nonfiction writing techniques for a variety of purposes and audiences. In writing essays or analyzing literature, mass media, or other cultural texts, students practice various critical approaches and persuasion strategies. The course may also treat advanced topics in manuscript conventions, style and voice, research methods, logical argument, and rhetoric. Prerequisite(s): ENG 3300 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3340 Creative Non-Fiction


    This advanced writing seminar covers various forms of creative non-fiction prose, treating such genres as the personal essay, memoir, literary journalism, the nature piece, and the travel essay. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2310  OR ENG 3300 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3360 Introduction to Adolescent Literature


    A study of classical and contemporary coming-of-age narratives written by, for, and about adolescents. The course may include works by writers such as Twain, Frank, Salinger, and Kincaid. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3370 Children’s Literature


    A study of genres including fairytales, historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction in a variety of classical and contemporary works. The course may include works by writers such as Carroll, White, Barrie, Rowling, and Taylor. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3380 Fiction Writing


    A writing workshop with an emphasis on crafting stories or longer fictional works. The elements of fiction - character, dialogue, narrative voice, description, point of view, plot, structure - are discussed and analyzed in the work of professional story-writers. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2310  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3390 Poetry Writing Seminar


    An advanced workshop for students committed to further work in poetry, with emphasis on exposure to a variety of poetic methods and forms and the development of each writer’s individual voice and style. Students work on individual projects as well as meet as a group to discuss craft, collaborate in editing workshops, and gain background in the history of poetry. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2310 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3400 Contemporary Literature


    An introduction to both traditional and experimental fiction, poetry, and drama drawn from all cultures from approximately 1960 to the present. Novelists may include Marquez, Morrison, Kundera, Kureishi, Carver, Oates, and Cisneros; poets may include Rich, Ashbery, Walcott, Heaney, Amichai, Lorde, Milosz, and Szymborska; and playwrights may include Albee, Stoppard, Mamet, Kushner, Wassersein, and Fugard. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3410 The Beat Generation


    An exploration of the poetry, fiction, and memoirs of the Beat Generation. Authors may include Jack Kerouac, William S. Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, Paul Bowles, Diane de Prima, and Helen Adam. The course also assesses the legacy of the Beat Generation. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3420 Contemporary American Fiction


    A survey of American fiction since 1968, this course explores selected works of imporant short story writers and novelists in their aesthetic, historical, and cultural contexts. Authors may include Donald Barthelme, Raymond Carver, T.C. Boyle, George Saunders, Sandra Cisneros, Bharati Mukherjee, E.L. Doctorow, DonDeLillo, Toni Morrison, and Barbara Kingsolver. The course familiarizes students with the conventions of the short story and novel genres, as well as investigates how post-modern sensibilities, consumer/mass culture, and multi-ethnic and global issues impinge on current American literary practices. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3430 Writing Experimental Fiction


    This advanced writing class focuses on the creation of experimental fiction, with attention to its twentieth-century, literary history. Students practice techniques of surrealism, metafiction, pastiche, cut-ups, and other non-realistic, non-traditional and postmodern methods of producing fiction. In a workshop format, sutdents share their writings and critique the work of peers throughout the semester. Readings include innovative fiction by the likes of John Barth, Donald Barthelme, Angela Carter, Robert Coover, Jamaica Kincaid, Rick Moody, Haruki Murakami, and others. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2310 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3500 Literature of American Cultures


    This course will offer a study of the literature of American cultures with a focus on Native American, Latino/a, Asian American, and African American writers and texts. In its focus on issues of identity(racial-based, class-based, and gender-based), this comparative study of Ethnic American literature explores the ways in which identities are constructed in literary texts. To understand the socio-cultural context of literary works, the course will encourage students to examine the historical background of each author and his/her text as examples of how each respective group responds to life in the United States, in particular its often conflicted and mediated relation with dominant cultural norms. Finally, we will examine how authors deploy imaginative, narrative, and linguistic strategies in literature to comment upon issues of diversity and social injustice. This course may include short stories, novels, poetry, autobiography,memoir, and drama.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3510 Asian American Literature


    A literature course introducing modern and contemporary Asian American literature, including oral histories, novels, poetry, and memoir. These works are examined within their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Authors may include Kingston, Hwang, Mukherjee, Jen, Hagedorn, Yamanaka, Hongo, Bulosan. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3520 African American Poetry


    Critically studies African American poetry, including vernacular forms. Identifies formal elements of poetry while attending to the political and historical contexts of the writing. Authors may include Wheatley, Horton, Hammon, F.E.W. Harper, DuBois, J.W. Johnson, Dunbar, Hughes, McKay, Toomer, Spencer, G.D. Johnson, Brooks, Jones, M. Harper, Hayden, Jordan, Reed, Giovanni, Sanchez, Clifton, Mullen, Alexander, and Komunyakaa. Vernacular forms studied may include spirituals, work songs, sermons, the blues, gospel, jazz, and hip hop. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3530 Modern Indian Literature


    An examination of significant works of the literature of India, from the colonial period to the present, which may include novels, poetry, memoirs, and travelogues. The course focuses on modern and contemporary authors and offers an opportunity to examine works in their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Authors may include Rudyard Kipling, R.K. Naryan, Rabindranath Tagore, Salman Rushdie, Anita Desai, and Arundhati Roy. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500  AND (ENG 2000  OR ASN 2010 ) Cross Listed Course(s): (Cross-Listed with ASN 3530 ).
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3540 Readings in Global Literature


    This course introduces students to representative texts in literatures from across the world, focusing especially on literatures from the global south/ non-western world, which may range from the ancient to the modern and contemporary periods. The course emphasizes a broadly comparative perspective which situates literary texts, either Anglophone or in translation, from different regions, both in specific cultural and political contexts, as well as studies them in depth from a boadly literary perspective in conversation and canonical western literary texts and genres. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500  and ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3550 Writing Sudden Fiction


    This advanced writing class focuses on the composition of brief works of fictional prose known variously as sudden fiction, short-short fiction, micro fiction, and flash fiction. Through reading and writing assignments, the course explores the full range of this thriving genre - touching on the prose poem, the anecdote, the epistle, the fable, the parable, and other related forms along the way. Throughout the semester, students share their writings and critique the work of their peers in a workshop format. Readings include short literary texts by Baudelaire, Kawabata, Cisneros, Edson, Kincaid, Lydia Davis, Alessandro Baricco, and others. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2310 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3570 Becoming New York: Literature, History, Culture: 1844-1898


    A multi-disciplinary approach to the literature, history, and culture of New York that includes subjects such as immigration, the Civil War and the draft riots; the intrigue of New York as celebrated by Melville, Poe, Whitman, James, and Howell; the impact of building public transporation and public space such as Central Park and the Brooklyn Bridge; tenement housing and reform movements; and the unification of the five boroughs. Also included are films such as The Gangs of New York and Washington Square. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3580 Women in Modern Japanese Literature


    This course examines the portrayal of women, gender, and sexuality in contemporary Japanese culture and society. Drawing on literary genres from the traditional to manga art and animé creations, the course explores such universal topics as notions of the self, national and gender identity, colonialism, war and its atomic aftermath, sexual liberation, globalism, and aging in Japan’s modern period (1868 - present). What Japanese writers have learned from and transmitted to Japan’s regional neighbors and world literature and how the concerns of the global women’s movement have manifested themselves in Japanese literature are major focii of discussion. All readings will be in English. Cross Listed Course(s): Cross listed with ASN 3250 , JPAN 3250 , WGS 3560 .
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3690 Imagining War


    This course will develop students’ appreciation and understanding of the literary and historical context of war and challenge them to explore a variety of issues (gender, social class, pacifism, nationalism, the Home Front) through reading, writing, and discussion of literary and historical texts. These texts may vary by genre, historical period, or country of origin, and may include primary sources, memoir, poetry, fiction, film, media, and the visual arts. The goal of the course is to explore a single war from the 20th or 21st century. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3760 Life/Writings Indigenous Women


    This course studies the richness of the culture and literatures of women from indigenous communities, and the systemic oppression that they have been/are subject to due to race, caste, gender, and class. The communities include Native American, Australian Aborigine, and Dalit women from India. The traditional and historical status of these women in relation to their social, economic, and political status today is studied in individual stores, memoirs, songs, poetry, and fiction. Significant texts in translated literary forms and works are used as primary resources. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 3990 Selected Topics


    A topic of literary interest proposed by a faculty member for one semester only.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0
  
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    ENG 4010 Linguistics/Grammar


    Study of contemporary grammars to understand the structures and functions of the varieties of English. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 4020 Develop English Language


    A historical survey of changes in English vocabulary, pronunciation, spelling, and grammar, including the social context of language change. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 4030 Grammar and Style


    The study of the contemporary American English sentence in its historical and sociolinguistic contexts, with attention to the structure of the sentence, editing problems for writers, the role of Standard English, and variation for stylistic effect. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 4100 Chaucer and His Age


    Emphasis is on Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and Chaucer’s language, late Middle English of the South East Midlands. Some attention is given to the historical background of the period and, if time permits, a number of Chaucer’s shorter works are read and discussed. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 4110 Shakespeare Comedy/Hist


    Study of such plays as Richard II, Henry IV, Henry V, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, and Twelfth Night. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 4120 Shakespeare Tragedy/Rom


    Study of such plays as Hamlet, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet, Othello, King Lear, and The Tempest. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 4130 Milton


    An intensive study of the selected works of John Milton with emphasis on Paradise Lost. Particular attention is paid to the social, religious, political, and intellectual climate in which he wrote. Course may also include some of Milton’s shorter works, such as Lycidas, Areopagitica, selected sonnets, and Samson Agonistes. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 4200 Literary Theory


    Major literary theories and practices from Aristotle to the present are considered, with special emphasis on contemporary problems. A variety of writing assignments in criticism are featured. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 4210 Literature and Psychoanalysis


    A study of literature through application of depth psychology; analysis of short works such as Oedipus Rex and the short stories of Poe, Kafka, Melville and Hawthorne. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 4220 Psychological Novel


    The relationship between depth psychology and literature and the use of psychoanalysis in interpreting and understanding the novel. Authors may include Gide, Woolf, Joyce, Beckett and others. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 4230 Myth, Symbol and Literature


    Study of symbol, ritual and myth formation and primitive, classical, biblical and social symbols and myths as they appear and function in literature and other media. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 4800 Seminar English Literature


    An in-depth study of a single British author, work, or movement, chosen by the instructor. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 4810 Seminar American Literature


    An in-depth study of a single American author, work, or movement, chosen by the instructor. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0 - 6.0
  
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    ENG 4900 Internship


    On-the-job training with regional employers. Students write regularly for the employer and the academic coordinator.
    Credits: 3.0 - 9.0
  
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    ENG 4910 Literature Capstone


    The focus of this course is an in-depth, writing-intensive exploration of a special literary topic in which students practice interpretative literary skills at advanced levels using one or more literary critical theories, and compose literary criticism. In addition, students engage in reflective analysis of the English major experience, and get guidance on career opportunities.This course serves as a capstone experience for English Majors in the Literature Concentration.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 4920 Writing Capstone


    An in-depth writing intensive exploration of a special litererary topic or genre. Through practice of interpretive and compositional literary skills at advanced levels, portfolio preparation, and guidance on publishing and career opportunities, this course serves as a capstone experience for English Majors in the Writing Concentration. Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENG 4990 Independent Study


    As approved and to be arranged.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0

Environmental Science

  
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    ENV 1000 Fundamentals of Earth Science


    This course introduces students to basic concepts in chemistry and physics through observation, hypothesis formation, testing and evaluation. Particular attention is paid to topics that are commonly encountered in the study of Earth Science.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 1100 Environmental Sustainability


    An introduction to the study of environmental sustainablility from the viewpoints of several disciplines of the natural sciences, the social sciences and humanities. These disciplines include biology, chemistry, physics, geology, soils, political science, economics, law, anthropology, sociology, and ethics. The course stresses a holistic view of the environment. The companion workshops include field trips and hands-on experiences that complement the materials in the lecture. Students will be charged an additional Env Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    ENV 1150 General Geology


    Includes the study of the origin and evolution of the earth, the rocks and minerals that compose it, the geological processes that are constantly changing it, the origin and evolution of plants and animals that live upon it, and the role of geology in shaping man’s environment. Laboratory and field trips introduce rocks, minerals, fossils, maps, and landscape features. Three-hour lecture and discussion and two-and-a-half hour workshop. Students will be charged an additional Env Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    ENV 2160 Introduction to Oceanography


    The study of the origin, evolution, and extent of the oceans; waves, currents, tides, and tsunami; the plant and animal life of the sea; the nature and topography of the sea floor; recent discoveries relating to sea floor spreading and continental drift; the role of the oceans in weather and climate. Prerequisite(s): ENV 1100  AND ENV 1150  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 2170 Introduction To Oceanography


    This course is an introduction to the attributes and natural processes of the world’s oceans. topics to be covered include: the origin of the ocean basins, marine sedimentation, properties of seawater, ocean circulation, waves, tides, shallow water processes, aspects of marine ecology, biological productivity, coastal processes, ocean habitats, and their biota. The course will also cover some interdisciplinary components of oceanography, including the El Nino, Global Warming, and The Carbon Cycle. Prerequisite(s): ENV 1150 .
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    ENV 2200 Earth Through Time


    The study of the origin and evolution of the earth and life as revealed by the geological record in the rocks. Includes the concepts of plate tectonics and sea-floor spreading; the origin, growth and drift of the continents; the rise and fall of mountain ranges; the advance and retreat of the seas and glaciers and the evolution of plants and animals as shown by the fossil record. Major emphasis on the geological history of North America. Three-hour lecture and discussion, and two-and-a-half hour workshop. Students will be charged an additional Env Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): ENV 1150 
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    ENV 2500 Meteorology


    An introduction to the earth’s atmosphere, basic weather processes, climatology, and weather forecasting. Topics include: weather and the economy, the sun’s path and the seasons, barometric pressure and winds, air masses and fronts, storm weather, weather monitoring and prediction, earth’s climates, and human impact on weather and climate (air pollution, weather modification, and greenhouse effect).
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 3010 Field Experience


    This course places the student in an active working experience with either a professional agency, a business, or a municipal body involved in some pertinent work related to the environment. Objectives are to expand students’ backgrounds and their appreciation of the field, give them firsthand experience, and introduce them to potential employers or help them identify areas of specialization for graduate study. Students must work a minimum of one full day per week (120 hours per semester) with the agency to fulfull an on-the-job requirement. This requirement may also be fulfilled by a cooperative education placement with the program director’s recommendation. Prerequisite(s): ENV 1100  AND ENV 1150 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 3050 Mineralogy and Petrology


    This course provides an introduction to the study of earth materials - rocks and minerals - their description, classification, and origin.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 3170 Global Climate Change


    This course examines the nature, causes and extent of climate change through geological time, with a particular emphasis on how natural and human environments have responded to such change over the last several hundred thousand years. It focuses on the methods used to obtain proxy climate histories and the sources of these climate records, including ice cores, corals, tree rings, cave deposits, pollen,and coastal, desert amd fluvial landforms and sediments. The techniques used to determine the age of these deposits are also covered. The course will also include a review of the global climate system with particular emphasis on the role of humans in forcing global climate change. Prerequisite(s): ENV 1100  or ENV 1150  or ENV 2500 .
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    ENV 3200 Geochemistry


    This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of geochemistry, with an emphasis on those concepts that are pertinent to environmental science.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 3270 Geomorphology


    The nature, origin and evolution of landscapes and materials at or near the surface of the earth and the processes that bring about changes. The nature and properties of soils and the role of man and his activities.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 3300 Ecosystem Sustainability


    This course is an in-depth, interdisciplinary exploration of ecosystem services, to assess the consequences of ecosystem change for human well-being and the scientific basis for action and technology needed to enhance the conservation and sustainable use of those systems and their contribution to human well-being.

      Prerequisite(s): ENV 1100   or ENV 1150  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 3400 Environmental Law


    This course introduces the student to the workings of the American legal system, examines the body of existing environmental legislation in the United States, and discusses the probable direction of environmental regulation in the future. Prerequisite(s): ENV 1100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 3500 Energy and Sustainable Technology


    Modern human civilization depends upon energy to drive our machines, give us light, and regulate our thermal environment. Over the past century, the energy has largely come from fossil fuels like coal, oil, and natural gas. Many scientists are concerned that the byproducts of fossil fuel combustion are leading to potentially catastrophic climatic change. This course will introduce students to global energy production and how energy is used to transform our world physically and culturally. Students will explore the opportunities and threats inherent in varied energy production, including fossil fuels and renewables, and evaluate historical, current, and future energy consumption rates. Students will contrast energy consumption habits of various cultures and work to use this understanding to develop and present more sustainable systems of living and production. Students will also evaluate energy policy, conservation and mitigation strategies. Prerequisite(s): ENV 1100  or ENV 1150 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 3600 Ecosystem Sustainability


    This course is an in-depth, interdisciplinary exploration of ecosystem services, to assess the consequences of ecosystem change for human well-being and the scientific basis for action and technology needed to enhance the conservation and sustainable use of those systems and their contribution to human well-being. Prerequisite(s): ENV 1100  or ENV 1150 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 3750 Soils


    Acquaints students with the fundamentals of soil science. It teaches that soil is a natural resource that must be managed and conserved. Topics studied include the physical and chemical properties of soil, soil water, soils genesis and classification, soil microbiology, soil conservation and management. Particular attention is given to the soils of New Jersey.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 3760 Soil and Water Analysis


    This course acquaints the student with the fundamentals of soil and water analysis. The course emphasizes fieldwork and the measurement of chemical, physical, and biological properties of soil and water samples.
      Prerequisite(s):  ENV 1150  , CHEM 1610  or permission of instructor
    Credits: 2.0
  
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    ENV 3800 Junior Seminar


    This course isdesigned to give third-year students a chance to reflect upon their reasoning processes and learn how to evaluate critically a number of topics of major environmental concern. Methods of critical evaluation are taught as a means of investigating the logic and reasoning behind ideas and concepts. Arguments are analyzed for format, logic, justification and persuasiveness. All students are expected to take an active part in the discussions and evaluations. Oral and written reports on specific topics are discussed and team debate as needed. This is a writing intensive course.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 3890 Environmental Factors in Land Use


    Introduces the subject of the use and misuse of land, the consequent need for governmental review and regulation, and the important role of a Natural Resource Inventory (NRI) in that process. Surveys the components of an NRI and shows how portions of one are compiled. Final class sessions are devoted to students’ oral presentations of their semester projects.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 3990 Selected Topics


    A topic not covered by an existing course is offered as recommended by the department and approved by the dean. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chairperson.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0
  
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    ENV 4230 Pollutions,Hazards,Impact and Risk


    This course considers the toxic effects of natural substances and human-made pollutants on living organisms (both plants and animals) either in terrestrial or aquatic ecosystems. Biogeochemical cycles, metabolic pathways, toxicity testing and bioassays, epidemiology, mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and regulatory law are among the topics covered.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 4500 Environmental Computer Applications


    This course examines the application of mathematical computer simulation to the solution of environmental problems. The general development of computer models is reviewed as well as their specific use. The student employs working simulation models in the analysis of actual case studies while critically evaluating and comparing the results of different models for particular problems. Familiarity with basic principles of computer operation and some programming experience are expected of the student.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 4700 Hydrogeology


    Water is becoming one of the defining issues of our time, and water availablility and quality will almost certainly be affected by changes in climate and land use. In this class students will explore the components of the hydrologic cycle(precipitation, evaporation, transpiration, infiltration, ground-water flow, surface runoff and stream flow), issues that have and will continue to impact the water cycle and ‘Best Management Practices’ for water sustainability. Through examples and case studies we will examine environmental issues around water resources globally and locally. Assignments include readings, fieldwork, problem solving activities, and independent research projects. The class period will be formatted to be a mixture of filedwork, lectures and discussions, and hands on activities. Prerequisite(s): ENV 1150 , CHEM 1600  & MATH 1600 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 4800 Senior Environmental Practicum


    This is the capstone course in Environmental Science. In it, a group of senior students participate in a common project using methods and skills learned in the classroom. Depending on the project, these may include graphic and communications skills, data collection and evaluation, and field and laboratory techniques. Examples of projects include the compilation of a natural resource inventory for a neighboring community and the investigation of water quality in an urban stream. The instructor selects the subject of the study from student proposals, but each student’s role on the team is jointly determined by both the student and the instructor. Students and instructor seek to simulate the working conditions of a professional consulting team engaged in a practical project. Regular work meetings are held during class time with a formal written and oral presentation at the end of the semester. This is a UCC Area 5 course. This is a writing intensive course.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ENV 4810 Senior Seminar


    A continuation of ENV 4800 .
    Credits: 2.0
  
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    ENV 4990 Independent Study


    Independent research under the supervision of a faculty member. Alternatively, a student may undertake another co-op experience with a governmental agency, consulting firm or industry in the environmental area.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0

English as a Second Language

  
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    ESL 2100 Intermediate Reading For Multilingual Speakers


    This is a reading skills course for intermediate-level multilingual students from non-English language backgrounds. In this course, students develop their academic English reading strategies and practice a variety of critical reading skills using college-level texts and newspapers. In addition, students expand their academic vocabulary so that they are able to successfully negotiate the demands of their college coursework. (The advanced course addresses similar topics at a more sophisticated level.)
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ESL 2110 Intermediate Writing For Multilingual Speakers


    This is a writing course for intermediate-level multilingual students from non-English language backgrounds. Students develop their skills in writing topic sentences, paragraph development, organization, fluency, clarity, grammar, and mechanics (e.g. spelling and punctuation). Students compose texts on general education academic topics. Emphasis is on experiencing different stages of the composing process through cooperative learning strategies. (The advanced course addresses similar topics at a more sophisticated level.)
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ESL 3100 Advanced Reading


    This is a reading skills course for advanced-level multilingual students from non-English language backgrounds. In this course, students develop the ability to understand and interpret authentic college-level texts in content areas by applying appropriate reading strategies. Development of critical thinking skills and academic vocabulary through reading is emphasized. (The intermediate course addresses simiar topics at a less sophisticated level.)
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ESL 3110 Advanced Writing


    This is a writing course for advanced-level multilingual students from non-English language backgrounds. Students develop their ability to understand and respond to college-level writing assignments across the disciplines using the appropriate writing strategies, including proofreading and editing grammar. Major instructional approaches are writing process instruction, conference-centered writing instruction, and small group work. (The intermediate course addresses similar topics at a less sophisticated level.)
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    ESL 3210 Advanced Writing Workshop


    This is a writing workshop for multilingual students from non-English language backgrounds enrolled in ENG 1100  (Writing Effective Prose). The course is intended to further develop students’ competence on the rhetorical and syntactic levels. Students focus on gaining an understanding of the fundamental grammatical structures commonly used in academic writing as well as on developing effective editing skills.
    Credits: 2.0
  
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    ESL 3990 Selected Topics


    A topic not covered by an existing course is offered as recommended by the department and approved by the dean.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0
  
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    ESL 4990 Independent Study


    As approved and to be arranged with instructor and by chairperson.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0

Exercise Science

  
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    EXSC 1500 Aerobic Conditioning


    A complete aerobic fitness program that introduces various cardiovascular exercise programs to help students understand and experience the effect of aerobic conditioning.
    Credits: 2.0
  
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    EXSC 1600 Resist Flex Training


    A study of the fundamental principles of resistance and flexibility training with applications for personal fitness and sports.
    Credits: 2.0
  
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    EXSC 2100 Survey Athletic Injuries


    This course acquaints the student with the prevention, recognition, and basic management of athletic and exercise related injuries. Prerequisite(s):  BIO 1120  and KNES 1200  with a minimum grade of C-
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    EXSC 2800 Health Promotion and Fitness Management


    An investigation of the principles, applications and techniques of sport marketing and health promotion. Examines program development, program delivery, facilities, program accountability and budgeting.

      Prerequisite(s): BIO 1120  , KNES 1200  
    Credits: 3.0

 

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