Jul 05, 2020  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog

Courses


 

Exercise Science

  
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    EXSC 3100 Essentials of Strength and Conditioning


    Fundamental aspects of strength and conditioning are covered, including program design and resistance, endurance, and plyometric exercise techniques. This course also covers the basics of anatomy, physiology, biomechanics, nutrition, supplementation, and testing as it applies to resistance, speed, and power training. This course stresses both theory and application and is geared toward preparation in attaining the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists (CSCS) and Certified Personal Trainer (CPT) certifications administered by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). Prerequisite(s): KNES 3500  with a minimum grade of C
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    EXSC 3200 Graded Exercise Testing and Exercise Prescription


    This course provides theoretical information about the administration and application of graded exercise stress tests. The electrocardiogram (ECG) and maximum oxygen uptake values during rest and exercise are conducted. Students will be charged an additional Kinesiology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): KNES 3500  Minimum grade of C 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    EXSC 3300 Exercise Programs For Special Populations


    Students learn to organize, lead, and supervise programs of physical exercise and conditioning in industrial, business, recreational, educational, and athletic settings. The use of results of diagnostic tests to prescribe appropriate activities for a wide variety of populations is also covered. Prerequisite(s): KNES 3500  with a minimum grade of C
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    EXSC 3600 Exercise for Older Adults


    This course prepares students to plan and conduct basic physical activity and exercise programs for the
    elderly. Although the emphasis is on exercise routines and fitness programs, students also learn to lead
    older adults in rhythmic and dance activities and recreational games. A three-week training period is
    followed by a twelve-week practical experience at a senior citizen site (nutrition site, day care center, or
    some other center for older adults). Weekly seminars are held in conjunction with the practical
    experiences.
      Prerequisite(s): EXSC 1500  andKNES 3500  (C- or better)
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    EXSC 3800 Health Promotion and Fitness Management


    This course involves an investigation of the principles, application, and techniques of sport marketing and health promotion. This course also examines program development, program delivery, facilities, program accountability, and budgeting. Prerequisite(s): KNES 1200  with a minimum grade of C-,BIO 1120  with a minimum grade of C-.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    EXSC 3900 Aerobic and Anaerobic Exercise Leadership


    This course reviews the practical applications of exercise leadership for the apparently healthy individual as well as individuals with cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases and disabilities, neuromuscular disorders, and cognitive and emotional disorders. This course is a leadership physical activity course. Prerequisite(s): KNES 3500  with a minimum grade of C
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    EXSC 3901 Aerobic & Anaerobic Exercise Leadership I


    Practical applications of exercise leadership for the apparently healthy individual as well as individuals with cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, metabolic diseases, immunological/hematological disorders, orthopedic diseases and disabilities, neuromuscular disorders, and cognitive and emotional disorders. This class is a leadership physical activity course.

      Prerequisite(s): KNES 3300   (C- or better), KNES 3500   (C- or better), EXSC 1500  
    Credits: 3.00

  
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    EXSC 4100 Exercise Programs for Special Populations


    Students learn pathophysiology of various conditions, be able to assess pre-exercise health status, collect medical history and determine appropriate exercises for special populations. Students will learn how to use results from diagnostic tests to prescribe appropriate exercise and modify exercise based off of participant limitations.

      Prerequisite(s): KNES 3500 (C- or better), EXSC 3901  
    Credits: 3.0

  
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    EXSC 4200 Graded Exercise Testing and Prescription


    This course will provide theoretical information about the administration and application of graded exercise stress tests. The electrocardiogram (ECG) and maximum oxygen uptake values during rest and exercise will be conducted.

      Permission Required Prerequisite(s): KNES 3500 (C- or better)
    Credits: 3.00

  
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    EXSC 4300 Advanced Exercise Physiology and Sport Nutrition


    This course blends exercise physiology, chemistry, medicine, nutrition and physiology for the study of human nutrition and physical activity. Topics covered include bioenergetics, exercise metabolism, biochemical mechanisms and adaptations, ergogenic aids, effects of nutrients on exercise performance, body composition, weight control and eating disorders.

      Permission Required Prerequisite(s): KNES 3500   (C- or Better),PBHL 1500 
    Credits: 3.0

  
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    EXSC 4600 Exercise Programs For Older Adults


    Prepares students to plan and conduct basic physical activity and exercise programs for the elderly. Although the emphasis is on exercise routines and fitness programs, students also learn to lead older adults in rhythmic and dance activities and recreational games. A three-week training period is followed by a twelve-week practical experience at a senior citizen site (nutrition site, day care center or some other senior citizen center). Weekly seminars are held in conjunction with the practical experiences. Prerequisite(s): KNES 3500 with a minimum grade of C
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    EXSC 4800 Contemporary Issues in Exercise Science


    This course involves the investigation and study of current research topics using directed library research and readings as they apply to the field of exercise science. This course is the senior seminar course that is completed along with internship. This course is the first research based and writing intensive course in the exercise science discipline. Prerequisite(s): EXSC 2100  Minimum Grade of C-,EXSC 3100   Minimum Grade of C-,EXSC 3200  Minimum Grade of C-,EXSC 3300  Minimum Grade of C-,EXSC 3800  Minimum Grade of C-, EXSC 3900  Minimum Grade of C-,EXSC 4600   Minimum Grade of C-,EXSC 4820  Minimum Grade of C-
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    EXSC 4820 Advanced Exercise Physiology and Sport Nutrition


    This course blends exercise physiology, chemistry, medicine, nutrition, and physiology for the study of human nutrition and physical activity. Topics covered include bioenergetics, exercise metabolism, biochemical mechanisms and adaptations, ergogenic acids, effects of nutrients on exercise performance, body composition, weight control, and eating disorders. Students will be charged an additional Kinesiology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): KNES 3500  with a minimum grade of C
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    EXSC 4900 Internship in Exercise Physiology


    This is the culminating experience for students in the exercise physiology concentration. Students are assigned to a sport-specific training facility, corporate fitness center, hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation center, or other clinically-based wellness/fitness or rehabilitation facility for practical experience in the application of concepts. Students will be charged an additional Malpractice Liab Ins Fee when enrolling in this course. Exercise Science Majors Only Prerequisite(s): EXSC 2100  with a Minimum Grade of C-,EXSC 3100  with a Minimum Grade of C-,EXSC 3200  with a Minimum Grade of C-,EXSC 3300  with a Minimum Grade of C-,EXSC 3800  with a Minimum Grade of C-, EXSC 3900  with a Minimum Grade of C-,EXSC 4600    with a Minimum Grade of C-,EXSC 4820 with a Minimum Grade of C-.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    EXSC 4990 Independent Study


    Arranged with a faculty sponsor and agreed upon by the department chair and dean. (1-6 credits)
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0

Finance

  
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    FIN 3100 Money and Banking


    A study of the key concepts, theories, processes, and interrelationships that link money and banking to the workings of the U.S. economy. This course analyzes how banks and other depository institutions serve as a conduit for the implementation of monetary policy. The structure, functions, powers, and monetary tools of the Federal Reserve are also examined. Prerequisite(s): ECON 2010 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 3200 Corporate Finance


    A study of the basic principles and practices of the financial management of private business corporations. The course provides an operational framework for financial analysis, planning, and forecasting, along with profit analysis and financial control for today’s business world. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2110  AND ECON 2020 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 3500 Financial Markets and Institutions


    This course is an introduction to the dynamic structure of the financial markets’ environment in which financial institutions as well as other participants operate. The course explores the concepts and measurement of risk and return, explains how market interest rates are determined, analyzes the spread between various rates across major capital markets’ participants, and analyzes strategies to manage and modify return and risk in an uncertain environment. The emphasis is on identifying the characteristics of participants that give rise to basic similarities and/or differences in their behavior, rather than on their detailed operating business activities. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 3600 Personal Financial Planning


    An introductory course that surveys the financial planning process, client interactions, time value of money applications, personal financial statements, cash flow and debt management, asset acquisition, education planning, overview of risk management investment planning and retirement planning, special circumstances, plan integration, ethics, and the business of financial planning. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2110  AND ECON 2020 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 3690 Private Equity and Venture Capital


    This course focuses on private equity and venture capital, and provides an overview of the private equity industry, the market microstructure of the industry, and the interaction between private equity and entrepreneurs. Other topics discussed are private equity in developing nations, corporate venture capital, private equity securities, IPOs, venture leasing, private equity partnerships, and European private equity Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 3990 Selected Topics


    A topic not covered by an existing course.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0
  
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    FIN 4000 International Financial Management


    Financial management of a multinational enterprise. Topics include foreign exchange risk, political risk, long-run investment and financing decisions, working capital management, and valuation of operations and taxation. Also, investigation of the local and global interactions of multinational corporations with diverse cultures and societies. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4030 Capital Budgeting


    Examines the firm’s investment decisions in projects within the context of value creation. Covers investment decision making under certainty and under risk. Certainty equivalent, CAPM and risk adjusted return, sequential decision making, and sensitivity models are discussed. Problems and cases are assigned for analysis and class presentation. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4060 Commercial Bank Management


    The course provides a rigorous introduction to the world of commercial banking and related financial services at an undergraduate level, which includes an overview of field, an analysis of commercial banks including how to analyze and evaluate bank accounting and financial statements; profit drivers in banking; managing principal risks in banking including credit (loan management) and interest rate (asset liability management) risks, as well as regulatory and operational risks.  Finally, it pulls everything together to discuss the evolving role of commercial banking in the dynamic world of the twenty first century.  The course is designed for students who are interested in a career in banking and financial services, or for those who are already there and would like to upgrade their discipline based analytical and other skills. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4090 Income Tax Analysis and Planning


    Focuses on principles and current law and practice of income taxation and its impact on financial planning for individuals, couples, and families in their roles as investors, employees, and business owners. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2110  AND ACCT 2120 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4100 Taxation I


    A study of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code with emphasis on income taxation of individuals. Provides practice in the preparation of tax returns and the solutions of case problems. Concentrates on the problems of U.S. individual income tax, but taxation of corporations and partnership is also examined. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2110  AND ACCT 2120 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4110 Taxation II


    A study of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code with emphasis on the taxation of corporations, partnerships, estates, and trusts. Federal payroll, gift and estate, and New Jersey taxes are also covered. Prerequisite(s): (ACCT 4100  OR FIN 4100 ) AND ACCT 2110  AND ACCT 2120 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4150 Managerial Economics


    The application of economic analysis to the solution of individual business problems. Among the primary areas covered are demand forecasting, cost and profit analysis, and capital budgeting. Prerequisite(s): ECON 2010  AND ECON 2020  AND ECON 2100  AND MATH 1400 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4250 Credit Analysis in Commercial Banking


    The course will provide a rigorous and hands on exposure to the world of commercial credit as practiced in commercial banking.  This will involve both a macro overview of the issue of bank credit and a hands -on learning of how to analyze, evaluate understand a borrower’s ( commercial) credit needs and how the bank could meet those needs and finally prepare an application specifically outlining the results of the above analysis for senior management.  This is a highly innovative and practical course, which will be part of a “Credit Analysis and Bank Management “program track, within the department of finance, which will educate and train students to become credit analyst for banks directly coming out of the program. 
      Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4270 Real Estate Financing


    The course provides a rigorous introduction to the world of credit analysis for real estate financing in US commercial banking and related financial services at an undergraduate level.  This includes an introduction to and overview of the field of real estate financing; real estate related profit (or loss) drivers in banking; managing principal risks in real estate including credit (loan management) and interest rate (asset liability management) risks, as well as regulatory and operational issues specific to real estate.  Finally, it pulls everything together to discuss the role real estate lending and investment plays in commercial banking in the dynamic world of the twenty first century.  The course is designed for students who are interested in a career in banking and financial services, or for those who are already there and would like to upgrade their discipline based analytical and other skills.
      Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4300 Advanced Managerial Finance


    Presents an in-depth overview of the most recent developments in the field of finance and its applications. The topics include optimal capital structure and dividend policy, option valuation models and the application of option pricing theory to the theory of corporate finance, valuation of risky debt and term structure of interest rates, warrants and convertibles, and the analysis of mergers and acquisitions. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4350 Investment Analysis and Planning


    This course provides the student with an understanding of the various types of securities traded in financial markets, investment theory and practice, portfolio construction and management, and investment strategies and tactics. Prerequisite(s): ECON 2100  AND FIN 3200  AND (MATH 1400  OR MATH 1600  OR MATH 1170 )
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4360 Investments II


    The course will examine Modern Portfolio Theory (MPT) issues. It will elaborate on different concepts of rate of return and risk. It will talk about valuation and management of fixed income and equities. It will analyze security markets and institutions as well as instruments. It will discuss security and industry analysis. Furthermore, it will study investment policy determination, portfolio construction and performance evaluation. Prerequisite(s): FIN 4350 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4380 Introduction to Derivatives


    This course covers introduction to derivatives and basic hedging strategies using derivatives. Attention is paid to two primary types of derivative securities, futures and options. It examines the nature of various strategies involving futures and options on stocks, stock indexes, currencies and underlying futures. Both the standard binomial and Black-Scholes option pricing models will be discussed to value the options and futures. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4400 Government and Not-For-Profit Accounting


    This course covers accounting and financial reporting for governmental and not-for-profit entities. The emphasis is on teaching students the significance of reported information and how both users and preparers can interpret and analyze governmental and not-for-profit accounting information. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2120 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4450 Finance Information Systems


    The purpose of this course is to integrate financial concepts with technical skills in the analysis of financial markets and to apply technologies to evaluate and analyze theories learned in fundamental financial courses. This is a technology intensive course. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4500 Estate Planning


    Estate planning focuses on the efficient conservation and transfer of wealth, consistent with the client’s goals. It is a study of legal, tax, financial, and non-financial aspects of this process, convering topics such as trusts, wills, probate, advanced directives, charitable giving, wealth transfers, and related taxes. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200  OR FIN 3600 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4550 Retirement Planning


    The intent of the retirement planning course is to provide individuals with knowledge of both public and private retirement plans. The public plans include Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid. The private plans include both defined benefit and defined contribution plans and their regulatory provisions. The specifics of the various plans are analyzed, as well as non-qualified deferred compensation plans. Finally, issues that individuals face in retirement, such as lifestyle choices and medical issues, are discussed. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200  OR FIN 3600 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4600 Insurance Analysis/Planning


    This course introduces students to risk management and insurance decisions in personal financial planning. Topics include insurance for life, health, disability, property, and liability risks, as well as annuities, group insurance, and long term care. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200  OR FIN 3600 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4640 Acquisitions and Mergers


    Students will learn the issues of the motives of mergers and acquisitions, the tactics used by acquirers, or merging firms, valuation techniques for public and private firms, financing methods used in accomplishing M&As, actual cases of M&As, and they will apply financial structure and capital budgeting techniques to real world case studies.
      Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4650 Case Studies


    This course will help students apply theoretical approaches from corporate and investment courses to practical situations in the real financial markets. With the cases, students could understand financial concepts more thoroughly. Students could explore deeper grasp of key financial concepts such as cost of capital, capital budgeting, capital structure, financial forecasting, risk management and etc. by employing a case study approach.
      Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4850 Practicum in Finance


    A course of study designed especially for the supervised practical application of previously studied theory in a group setting. Done under the supervision of a faculty sponsor and coordinated with a business organization.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4860 Business Case Writing


    This is a cross-disciplinary course that represents the second part of the 6-credit practicum Honors option, which must be conducted over two semesters and undertaken in the junior or senior year. It will be a core component of the Practicum Honors option. Honors Practicum credits will be applied towards major concentration requirements. The course involves writing an effective business case based on the consulting report or business plan completed in the practicum course. This course will be supervised by a mentor chosen from the Cotsakos College of Business Academically Qualified (AQ) faculty members who participated in the corresponding practicum course.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4900 Internship in Finance


    This is a cooperative education/field work experience. The mission of the internship program is to provide students with a valuable employment experience by working, uninterrupted for a significant amount of time with a public, private, or governmental entity located in the student’s geographical area.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FIN 4990 Independent Study


    A special project supervised by faculty adviser. 1-6 credits.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0

Financial Planning

  
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    FINP 1600 Financial Well Being


    Financial well-being is designed to promote financial literacy among students in order to allow them to increase their overall financial, economic and social well-being. Consumers operate in a buyer beware marketplace and must be financially literate in order to achieve and maximize their own well-being and security. This course covers the basic financial planning process and will help students obtain a working knowledge of creating an investment portfolio, filing taxes, risk management, insurance, credit scores, credit reports, debt management, retirement planning and time value of money. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1060 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FINP 3600 Personal Financial Planning


    An introductory course that surveys the financial planning process, client interactions, time value of money applications, personal financial statements, cash flow and debt management, asset acquisition, education planning, overview of risk management investment planning and retirement planning, special circumstances, plan integration, ethics, and the business of financial planning. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2110  AND ECON 2020 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FINP 4090 Taxation I


    A study of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code with emphasis on income taxation of individuals. Provides practice in the preparation of tax returns and the solutions of case problems. Concentrates on the problems of U.S. individual income tax, but taxation of corporations and partnership is also examined. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2110  AND ACCT 2120  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FINP 4200 Financial Services Selling


    Develops understanding of financial service markets, competitive issues, trends, and client acquisition strategies. Students learn and practice individual and institutional needs-based selling skills and market strategies used among banking, securities, insurance, and diversified professional services. Targeting, initiating, and acquiring client relationships, expanding business opportunities, and maintaining long-term client relationships are the course’s focal points.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FINP 4350 Investment Analysis/Planning


    This course provides the student with an understanding of the various types of securities traded in financial markets, investment theory and practice, portfolio construction and management, and investment strategies and tactics. Prerequisite(s): ECON 2100  AND FIN 3200  AND (MATH 1400  OR MATH 1600  OR MATH 1170 )
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FINP 4500 Estate Planning


    Estate planning focuses on the efficient conservation and transfer of wealth, consistent with the client’s goals. It is a study of legal, tax, financial, and non-financial aspects of this process, convering topics such as trusts, wills, probate, advanced directives, charitable giving, wealth transfers, and related taxes. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200  OR FIN 3600 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FINP 4550 Retirement Planning


    The intent of the retirement planning course is to provide individuals with knowledge of both public and private retirement plans. The public plans include Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid. The private plans include both defined benefit and defined contribution plans and their regulatory provisions. The specifics of the various plans are analyzed, as well as non-qualified deferred compensation plans. Finally, issues that individuals face in retirement, such as lifestyle choices and medical issues, are discussed. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200  OR FIN 3600 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FINP 4600 Insurance Analysis/Planning


    This course introduces students to risk management and insurance decisions in personal financial planning. Topics include insurance for life, health, disability, property, and liability risks, as well as annuities, group insurance, and long term care. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3200  OR FIN 3600 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FINP 4700 Financial Planning Capstone


    The purpose of this course is to integrate all of your personal financial planning knowledge and apply that knowledge to create a comprehensive fianancial plan using professional software. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3600  OR FINP 3600 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FINP 4860 Business Case Writing


    This is a cross-disciplinary course that represents the second part of the 6-credit practicum Honors option, which must be conducted over two semesters and undertaken in the junior or senior year. It will be a core component of the Practicum Honors option. Honors Practicum credits will be applied towards major concentration requirements. The course involves writing an effective business case based on the consulting report or business plan completed in the practicum course. This course will be supervised by a mentor chosen from the Cotsakos College of Business Academically Qualified (AQ) faculty members who participated in the corresponding practicum course.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FINP 4900 Internship in Financial Planning


    This is a cooperative education/field work experience. The mission of the internship program is to provide students with a valuable employment experience by working, uninterrupted for a significant amount of time with a public, private, or governmental entity located in the student’s geographical area.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FINP 4990 Independent Study


    A special project supervised by faculty adviser. 1-6 credits.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0

French

  
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    FR 1060 Intensive Basic French


    This intensive introductory course develops the four areas of language skills - speaking, listening, writing, and reading - through interactive classroom work, laboratory exercises, and diverse oral and written assignments. Students use the language to gain an appreciation of the French and Francophone world.
    Credits: 6.0
  
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    FR 1070 Freshman Basic French I


    An introductory course that presumes no prior background in the language. The course develops the four areas of language skills–speaking, listening, writing, and reading–through interactive classroom work, laboratory exercises, and diverse oral and written assignments. Students use the language to gain a beginning appreciation of the French and Francophone world. Restricted to freshmen.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 1080 Freshman Basic French II


    A continuation of the grammar study of FR 107, with emphasis on further developing proficiency skills through reading and discussion of short texts and contemporary articles of current cultural relevance. Prerequisite(s): FR 1070 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 1100 Basic French I


    This introductory course presumes no prior background in the language. The course develops a beginning level of proficiency in the four areas of language skills - speaking, listening, writing, and reading - through interactive classroom work, laboratory exercises, and diverse oral and written assignments. Students use the language to gain a beginning appreciation of the French and Francophone world. Students can only receive a grade higher than a C- in this course.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 1110 Basic French II


    This is a continuation of the grammar study of FR 1100  with emphasis on further developing proficiency skills through reading and discussion of short texts or contemporary articles of current cultural relevance. Continued emphasis on oral interaction in French. Prerequisite(s): FR 1070  OR FR 1100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 2000 French Colonial Legacies


    This course offers an inrtroduction to the historical and cultural diversity of various- primarily non-European-French-speaking regions of the world. It discusses French colonialism and its distinct and complex legacies in different areas of sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, North America, Indo-China, the Caribbean, and France itself. Through historical, literary, and clultural readings and cinema, this course traces the effects of colonization on both the colonizer and the colonized, including its particular impact on women and children; thus grappling with issues of power and oppression, sexism, race and gender, enslavement and inequality, and justice and freedom. Taught in English.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 2100 Intermediate French I


    This course presumes novice-high proficiency in French, focusing on all four areas of language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Reinforces competence and proficiency gained in Basic French with a thorough review and further development of grammar and vocabulary. Training to read literary and journalistic selections in French and to write short grammatically and stylistically correct French compositions. Oral/aural practice through class discussions, presentations, and laboratory assignments. Enhances appreciation of the French and Francophone world through cultural readings and films. Prerequisite(s): FR 1110 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 2110 Intermediate French II


    This is the second half of an intermediate course that presumes intermediate/low proficiency in French, focusing on all four areas of language skills. The course develops skills gained in Intermediate I and offers further development of grammar and vocabulary. Guided readings of short texts in French, discussion of contemporary or historical events in the French-speaking world, continued practice with writing grammatically and stylistically correct French compositions. Oral/aural practice through class discussions, presentations, and laboratory assignments. Enhances appreciation of the French and Francophone world through cultural readings and films. Recommended for native speakers who need grammar review. Prerequisite(s): FR 2100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 2220 Stylistics and Advanced Composition


    Focusing primarily on two of the four areas of language skills - reading and writing - this course is addressed to students at the intermediate level who have good grasp of grammar and who need to improve and practice their written skills. The course further reinforces and solidifies grammatical concepts. It explores complexities and variations in written styles with a view to enabling the student to develop grammatically correct yet individually distinct written expression. Prerequisite(s): FR 2110 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 2400 Spoken French - Cultural Study


    A course in conversational French through the comparative study of cultures, this course is designed for students at the intermediate level desiring to hone and practice their oral skills. The course concentrates on two of the four areas of language skills - speaking and listening - through interactive classroom work, diverse oral exercises, activities, and assignments, all focused around the varied and distinct cultures of the Francophone world. Prerequisite(s): FR 2110 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 2500 Textual Analysis and Research Methods


    An introduction to bibliographical research and basic literary analytical methods and approaches, with attention to the exigencies of different literary genres. The course provides training in the use of academic writing in French, especially as it applies to literary analysis. It also provides an overview of the principal periods, movements, and trends of French literature and their historical contexts. Taught fully in French. Prerequisite(s): FR 2110 .
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 2710 International Cinema Narrative in Historical Perspective


    Course explores the historical and aesthetic development of narrative film from a global perspective, with special emphasis on international movements lying outside the classical Hollywood canon. Prerequisite(s): FR 2220  OR ENG 1100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 3000 Twentieth Century French and Francophone Literature in Translation


    This course enables students, through reading and critical discussion, to confront the ideas and and diverse styles of some of the major French and Francophone writers of the twentieth century. The literary works chosen (theater, poetry, short stories, and novels) reflect the immense social and artistic changes these writers have faced. Taught in English.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 3140 Advanced French Grammar


    This course introduces students to the subtleties of French grammar while putting an emphasis on syntactic and semantic structure of discourse. Designed for students who have already acquired an intermediate level of proficiency in French, the course further develops and improves written and oral language skills and enhances students’ knowledge of French grammar and syntax. This course is taught in French. Prerequisite(s): FR 2110 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 3200 Introduction Literary Interpretation


    Designed to introduce students to various means of approaching literary texts and to provide analytic tools for advanced literary study. The course reviews the traditional French “explication de texte,” offers a consideration of literary genres, and presents varied theoretical appraches to literature. The course is balanced between readings in theory and application of their relevance for the study of literary works. Prerequisite(s): FR 2500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 3310 The Modern Novel in French


    A study of the modern novel in French, with attention to such authors as Proust, Gide, Sartre, Camus, Duras, Robbe-Grillet, Djebar, and Conde, and to different schools and literary concerns. Prerequisite(s): FR 2500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 3330 Modern French Theatre


    Major dramatists and movements in modern French-language theater. Focus on French symbolist theater, existentialist theater, and theater of the absurd, with an introduction to theatrical theory. Prerequisite(s): FR 2500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 3360 French Poetry


    Studies French poetic traditions and major poetic works from the medieval period to postsurrealism. Prerequisite(s): FR 2500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 3370 Topics in Francophone Literature


    Introduces major poets, novelists, and dramatists of the French-speaking world, including study of their literary, critical, and political works. Focus varies. Topics might include the following: the different literary movements of the Caribbean and its main twentieth-century writers, such as Cesaire, Conde, Glissant; contemporary Quebec culture and literature, its historical and artistic considerations, political concerns, and relations to language through the works of such writers as Broussard, Micone, Roy, and Theoret; major writers in French from Morocco, Tunisia, and Algeria, such as Ben Jelloun, Boudjedra, Djebar, Mimouni, Yacine, including additional consideration of Beur writers in France; the major writers and literary movements in French-speaking sub-Saharan Africa within a historical and sociological context, considering work by Ba, Beyala, Kourouma, Laye, Ousmane, or Senghor. Prerequisite(s): FR 2000  AND FR 2500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 3410 Approaches To French and Francophone Cultural Studies


    An introduction to the field of Cultural Studies, this course transcends distinct disciplines to study the shift in focus in French and Francophone Studies toward a broader range of cultural forms. The course uses an interdisciplinary approach to examine France and the French-speaking world through different types of cultural production: ideas, images, and narratives. Examples of topics studied might include cinema, television, journalism, contemporary fiction, recent French politics, comic books, etc. Prerequisite(s): FR 2500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 3700 French Cinema


    This course offers an introduction to French cinema from its historical beginnings through its mid-century crises and the New Wave innovations to the diversity of its present-day perspective; cinematic techniques and innovations, diverse schools, the va-et-vient between American and French cinema. A secondary aim is to offer a cultural study of the films’ contexts: the cultural, political, and philosophical upheavals of twentieth-century France, the two World Wars, the Fifth Republic, the end of colonialism, and a shifting relation to other European countries and to the United States. Class discussion in English with additional discussion section in French; majors do work in French. Prerequisite(s): FR 2220  OR ENG 2290  OR COMM 2340 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 3710 Francophone Cinema


    Consideration of the development of Francophone cinema, its relations to French and American cinemas, its major concerns. Discussion of cinematographic innovations. Class discussion in English with additional discussion section in French; majors do work in French. Prerequisite(s): FR 2500  OR ENG 2290  OR COMM 2340 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 3800 Topics in Parisian Culture


    In conjunction with a trip to Paris, students study a particular period of movement relevant for an understanding of Parisian culture. Examples include nineteenth-century fin de siecle architecture, politics, and art; the French monarchy; Arab cultures in France; and surrealism. This class is Writing Intenisve.
    Credits: 1.0 - 3.0
  
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    FR 3990 Selected Topics


    A topic not covered by an existing course is offered as recommended by the department and approved by the dean.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0
  
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    FR 4000 Topics in Cultural Studies


    Topic varies. An examination of a significant period or theme in French or Francophone society (revolution, World War II, Algerian Revolution, Surrealism, colonialism, religion, etc.) and its impact on political, literary, media, artistic, social concerns, or productions. May be repeated for credit if a different topic offered. Prerequisite(s): FR 2500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 4320 Nineteenth Century French Narrative Prose


    The course provides a survey of major texts of narrative prose through close reading of novels and short stories. The course sketches a general picture of nineteenth-century France: historical events, artistic and cultural themes, and major literary movements. Special attention is given to fictional techniques and to innovation of literary form in the work of Hugo, Balzac, Merimee, Stendhal, Flaubert, Nerval, Maupassant, Zola, and Barbey d’Aurevilly. Prerequisite(s): FR 2500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 4380 Literature French Enlightenment


    The transition from French classicism to the eighteenth-century revolt against authority and tradition. Selections from Montesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire, Beaumarchais. Introduction to the eighteenth-century French novel and psychological drama. Prerequisite(s): FR 2500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 4520 Translation Theory and Practice


    This course is in the art and practice of translating from English to French and from French to English, with primary emphasis on the latter. Includes some theoretical readings. Practice in translating diverse texts (literary, business, media,) structural comparision, analysis of different translations of a given text, comparative stylistic study. Prerequisite(s): FR 2500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 4800 Senior Seminar


    Includes an In-depth study of a selected author or theme or of a particular topic in French and Francophone studies.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    FR 4990 Independent Study


    As approved and to be arranged.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0

Geography

  
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    GEO 1500 World Regional Geography


    This course is organized into two parts as follows: The first part will introduce students to key geographic concepts, theories, themes and methods, and how these concepts and methods can be used to study and interpret the human and physical landscapes of our world. The second part examines the physical and human geographies of major regions of the world in terms of the physical, environmental, economic, social, cultural, and political factors that have shaped and continue to shape their distinctive physical and human geographies. Major regions to be examined include Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, North America, Europe, East Asia, South Asia, Southwestern Asia (the Middle East), and Russia and Neighboring Countries.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    GEO 1600 Introduction To Physical Geography


    An introductory course using a process-distribution approach to explain weather systems, climates of the world, biogeography, soils, and landforms. An accompanying lab introduces topographic map reading, weather, and climate analysis geomorphology. Students will be charged an additional Geography Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    GEO 2020 Research Methods in Geography


    This course is designed to familiarize Geography majors with the principles and process of social scientific inquiry. Students will learn the fundamentals of social science research in general and scientific geographic research in particular. Discussions and activities will focus on the research process, including how research questions are formulated, review and evaluation of relevant geographic literature, the nature and sources of geographic data, the collection and analysis of data, and the interpretation and presentation of research findings in oral and written format. Ethical issues and concerns in social science research will also be examined. The use of statistical software program is a key part of this course.  Course may be repeated one time for a maximum of six credits.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    GEO 2030 Introduction To Geographic Information Sciences and Techniques


    The purpose of this course is to expose students to the concepts, methods, and applications involved in Geographic Information Sciences and Techniques, which includes digital Cartography, Aerial Photo Interpretation, Image Processing, Remote Sensing, Computer Mapping, Global Positioning System (GPS), and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Some of the topics that will be covered include spatial data structure, coordinate and projection systems, spatial data collection and integration, data generalization and classification, the functionality of GIS and different Geospatial Techniques, data integration, geographical analysis, and applications on urban, demographic, resource, environment, and social issues. The lectures and lab exercises will provide introductory knowledge, basic skills, and practical experience of GISciences and Techniques needed in research and professional work. This is a technology intensive course.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    GEO 2040 Multicultural Geography of USA


    his course examines the geography of American racism and classism through the     lens of social science, integrating geography, history, political economy, and other factors that have and continue to shape America’s multicultural geographies. Issues of equality and justice will be addressed by examining the role of dominant social institutions such as the economy, government, political organizations, media and culture in determining the socioeconomic well-being and geographic realities of minoritized groups. Emphasis is placed on the roles of social institutions in shaping biases related to racism and classism issues and settlement structures. Social institutions are vehicles that support     common cultural goals and objectives. Social institutions can play both positive and     negative roles in shaping immigrant experiences and in preserving cultural values and beliefs. The course provides an overview of Post-World War II patterns of multicultural geographies within the United States, including the dramatic changes in U.S. immigration policies responsible for the visible and significant human geographies that have formed in the Post-WWII America.

    This course fulfills UCC Area 4-DJUS.
    Credits: 3.0

  
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    GEO 2100 Human Geography


    The course explores the basic principles of human geography. Major topics to be covered include population, language, economics, urbanization, industrialization, globalization, and the environment.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    GEO 2200 Environment and Humans


    This course is concerned with the way we interact with the world around us; the causes, consequences, and potential solutions to environmental problems we create. The course will also introduce students to major theories in human and environmental geography, and offer basic explanations for local, national, and global variation in human geographic aspects such as population, agriculture, biodiversity, resources (water, minerals, forests), atmospheric composition, global climate change, energy and waste management.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    GEO 2300 Global Population Issues


    This course introduces students to population concepts, theories, methods, issues, and their application to the constantly changing world around us. The course is organized into four parts as follows: The first part introduces students to major global population trends, perspectivesx of population growth, and sources of demographic data. The second part deals with demographic processes including world health, fertility, and migration transformations. The third part examines the effects of population processes such as mortality and migration on society. The fourth part analyzes the relationship between population and the environment at local, regional, and global scales.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    GEO 3000 Political Geography


    This course covers the influence of such factors as location, size, form, surface, climate, natural resources, and population on the political development of nations and their roles in world politics.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    GEO 3030 Remote Sensing


    This course introduces students to fundamental techniques in Remote Sensing and Aerial Photo Interpretation, the functions and capabilities of those techniques, and the application of these techniques in economic and demographic analyses and environmental planning and management. Topics to be covered include: basic elements of aerial photo interpretation, types and applications of aerial photography, photographic systems, digital images, data acquisition with remote sensing systems, aerial photo interpretation and measurement, image enhancement, geometric rectification, spectral enhancement, supervised and unsupervised classification, and integration of Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems. Prerequisite(s): GEO 1500  
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    GEO 3100 Trade and Transportation


    A study of the theory of international commodities trade; commercial policies and agreements among the world’s trading nations. The course also examines the role of transportation in determining movement and marketing of goods and international trade patterns, and payments. Prerequisite(s): GEO 1500  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    GEO 3200 Cultural Geography


    Cultural geography is a subfield within human geography that deals with the study of cultural products and norms and their variations across and relations to spaces, places and regions. It looks at the characteristics of people in a location with respect to their language, religion, ethnicity, architecture, foods, clothing, and how these affect the environment. The course will discuss the nature and spatial distribution of major cultural features including population, migration, language, religion, ethnicity and political systems utlizing examples from Africa, Asia and Latin America. The problems resulting from the depletion, destruction, and inefficient use of resources such as energy, water, air, mineral, forests and soils in developing countires will also be addressed.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    GEO 3210 Geography of the Global Economy


    Economic geography is a subfield of geography concerned with the spatial organization and distribution of economic activities, the use of the world’s resources, and the geographic structure and expansion of the world economy. The first part of the course will introduce students to major theories in economic geography. The second part will offer explanations for local, national, and regional variations in economic activites, resource utilization, economic growth and decline, wealth and poverty, and economic development problems.
    Credits: 3.0
 

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