Oct 27, 2020  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Communication

  
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    COMM 3730 Comedy Writing/Performing II


    This course builds on the writing and performing skills achieved in the Fundamentals of Comedy Writing and Performing course by enhancing the quality of students’ stand-up comedy. Students are also introduced to the business side of making a career in comedy writing and performing. Prerequisite(s): COMM 2730 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 3760 Comedy Writing Prime Time Television


    The process and experience of writing a sitcom script from pitch to final script is learned from analysis and deconstruction of network and cable television sitcoms.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 3770 Directing For Stage/Media


    Principles and theories for directing plays, from the text to the visual. Practical experience in guiding performers as they create characters for stage and other media. Prerequisite(s): COMM 1020 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 3800 Stage Management


    Introductory training in the duties of the manager in the normal process of producing a play. Audition, rehearsal period, performance, and post-performance function and procedures are examined.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 3810 Scene Painting II


    A study of the basic styles of scene painting with a concentration on dry pigments and casein mediums. This course allows a student to develop a basic ability to interpret the scenic designer’s elevations and reproduce them for the stage and media.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 3820 Lighting II


    Advanced training in the problems of lighting design and control as related to their application to production on the stage and in the media.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 3830 Scene Design II


    An advanced study of the problems of the scenic designer in theater, television, and film. Concentration is on the areas of materials and techniques. The student is expected to produce models and renderings utilizing various techniques and structures.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 3840 History of Theater


    Explores the historical development of drama, the physical theater, and technical theater arts from ancient Greece to the present. Investigates the social and cultural forces that shaped the theater, and were shaped by the theater, and develops critical standards of theater. The student is expected to attend representative theater productions.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 3860 Acting For TV II


    An advanced course in television acting that includes challenging work on various modes of dramatic literature adapted to television. In addition, the course features advanced performing techniques and varied experiences with the dramatic television director. Prerequisite(s): COMM 2740 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 3880 American Theater and Drama


    The study of the development of the American theater and its drama from the colonial period to the present with emphasis on twentieth-century American drama. Prerequisite(s): COMM 1010 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 3890 Drama For Children


    Study of the importance of dramatic process in a child’s individual and social growth. Investigation of the dynamics of the creative process within formal drama (children’s theater) and informal drama (creative dramatics).
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 3990 Selected Topics


    A topic not covered by an existing course is offered as recommended by the department and approved by the dean.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0
  
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    COMM 4200 Nonverbal Communication


    This course will examine the different non-verbal communication codes and explore their functions in daily interactions. For example, it will examine the functions that non-verbal codes serve in impression formation, social influence, relationship development, business settings, and negotiations. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3600 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4210 Broadcast Management


    An appraisal of management problems in commercial broad-casting for the advanced student. Includes sales and profit, personnel, programming, audience, governmental regulations, and technical factors. Prerequisite(s): COMM 2200 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4240 Radio Production Workshop


    An advanced course in audio production designed to augment the student’s skills and techniques in radio production. Direction and production of various commercial and non-commercial spots, news documentary, discussion, and music formats are produced for airing on campus radio and commercial and noncommercial public radio stations. Students will be charged an additional Communication Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): COMM 2250 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4250 TV Workshop


    Students produce, write, and direct video projects dealing with instructional material, news and public affairs, and entertainment programming. Projects must be programmable for campus use, cable television, public broadcasting, and other open circuit channels. Students will be charged an additional Communication Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): COMM 2270  AND COMM 2260  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4310 Screenwriting


    This course is an introductory screenwriting course designed to present and explore the elements of the traditional, narrative screenplay. These elements include (but are not limited to) story structure,character development, action. dialogue, subtext, plot and theme. We will examine these elements, in detail, in both feature film and short film formats. Prerequisite(s): COMM 2340 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4320 Dramatic Film Production


    An intensive production workshop designed for film and video students who wish to integrate several media production techniques in individual advanced projects. The purpose of this course is to examine the different production approaches used in the making of diverse products from documentaries to music videos to television commercials to independent dramatic and experimental films. Students will be charged an additional Communication Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3320  AND COMM 4310 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4330 Film and Genres


    This course investigates the cultural, social, political, economic, and institutional conditions generating national and international genre films. The course does not privilege certain genres, but selects significant films from a cross section of genres including science fiction, horror, musical, crime, comedy, western, biopic, drama and the numerous subgenres such as “coming of age” films that have historically evolved. From a theoretical perpective we analyze the thematic, narrative, aesthetic, and ideological genre dimensions and their expansive and mutable characteristics when translated within different cultural, national and global contexts. Central to genre analysis is the relationship between the insitutional production of genre forms and audience expectations and recognition required for economic stability of the industry and the maintenance, transformations and/or decline in genre forms. Spectator consumption and gratification is investigated through the representation of race, gender, class, and national identity. Prerequisite(s): COMM 2340 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4340 Current Cinema


    A film analysis course focusing on contemporary film and criticism. The class looks at recent works from the international and independent film world and particularly those works that are innovative and unconventional in their approach. The films are considered within current theoretical, aesthetic, and social contexts using different perspectives: the technical and economic aspects of filmmaking, the ideological and psychological effects of cinema, and the recent aesthetic developments of the art form. This advanced cinema studies course is designed for students who want to strengthen their critical writing skills and for filmmakers who want to expand their aesthetic and creative knowledge of the medium. Prerequisite(s): COMM 2340 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4350 Italian and Italian-American Cinema


    This course is designed to introduce students to the seminal works of Italian and Italian-American Cinema and to examine them in their social/cultural, historical/political and artistic contexts. Emphasis is placed on film aesthetics and story structure in an exploration of the ways in which groundbreaking Italian films (primarily from the 1930’s to the 1960’s) influenced the films of italian-American filmmakers (primarily from the 1970’s to the present). Prerequisite(s): COMM 2340  AND ENG 1100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4360 Writing the TV Drama


    This has been called the golden age of television because of the proliferation of quality one-hour dramatic television. This course will provide the student with an understanding of the art and craft of writing the one-hour dramatic television show. From idea generation, script and character development, creating a show “Bible,”* to working in the “Writer’s Room,” this course will require progressive writing assignments that give the student a complete understanding, and real-world experience of what goes into the writing and creation of the one-hour dramatic TV show. 

    Each student will complete a final “Spec Script”** of a TV show (44-50 pages), as well a proposal for an original show. 

    To be clear: Dramatic TV Shows offer an eye into worlds, cultures, philosophies, manners and mores that are different than those of the viewer. Because of this, the writer, MUST- every step of the way- embark on creating, through research and inquiry, a true representation of the world they are presenting. This class, by using these methods, and through its focus on understanding the worlds presented, will seek to empower the student to avoid stereotypes and caricatures of character, cultures, philosophies and mores, by focusing on creating true-life reorientations of all groups. 

    This course is Writing Intensive. Prerequisite(s): COMM 2100  
    Credits: 3.00

  
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    COMM 4370 Film Editing


    An advanced course for students who have basic film production and postproduction knowledge and wish to learn the standard techniques of digital editing for a sound film. In a workshop environment, the student becomes familiar with editing vocabulary, equipment, and procedures. The techniques of editing picture and sound are examined in lectures and later applied in a series of hands-on exercises and creative assignments. At the same time, the class balances the technical by providing an aesthetic overview of historical and current editing styles used in this complex art. Students will be charged an additional Communication Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3310 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4430 Seminar in Communication Studies


    Applied Communication provides students with a comprehensive analysis of contemporary communication theory and research. Students are nurtured in their application of selected communication theories in their chosen professional area of interest. The impact of communication is examined in a range of contexts, including interpersonal, small group, organizational, cultural, and mass communication.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4450 Communication Capstone - Communication Studies


    Working closely with individual faculty members and the course coordinator, students will conduct an in-depth communication research study, or create an advanced level communication project in this primary area of their expertise. Students registering for this course must complete a standardized form detailing the capstone project.  The semester long project will be determined by the student and approved by the directing faculty member and the faculty coordinator.  Students must complete COMM 1190 and major requirements before taking capstone.  Permission is required for registration.

    This class is Writing Intensive.  Permission of the departmetn is required. Prerequisite(s): COMM 1190 COMM 1210 ,COMM 2440 ,COMM 2650 ,COMM 3400 COMM 3600  AND COMM 4630  
    Credits: 3.0

  
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    COMM 4451 Communication Capstone-Broadcast Journalism


    Working closely with individual faculty members and the course coordinator, students will conduct an in-depth communication research study, or create an advanced level communication project in this primary area of their expertise. Students registering for this course must complete a standardized form detailing the capstone project. The semester long project will be determined by the student and approved by the directing faculty member and the faculty coordinator. Students must complete COMM 1190  and major requirements before taking capstone. Permission is required for registration. Prerequisite(s): COMM 1190  AND COMM 1200  AND COMM 2100  AND COMM 2220  AND COMM 2490  AND COMM 2500  AND COMM 3500  AND COMM 3550  AND COMM 4520  AND COMM 4550  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4452 Communication Capstone-Journalism


    Working closely with individual faculty members and the course coordinator, students will conduct an in-depth communication research study, or create an advanced level communication project in this primary area of their expertise. Students registering for this course must complete a standardized form detailing the capstone project. The semester long project will be determined by the student and approved by the directing faculty member and the faculty coordinator. Students must complete COMM 1190  and major requirements before taking capstone. Permission is required for registration. Prerequisite(s): COMM 1190  AND COMM 1200  AND COMM 2100  AND COMM 2220  AND COMM 2490  AND COMM 2500  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4453 Communication Capstone- Public Relations


    Working closely with individual faculty members and the course coordinator, students will conduct an in-depth communication research study, or create an advanced level communication project in this primary area of their expertise. Students registering for this course must complete a standardized form detailing the capstone project. The semester long project will be determined by the student and approved by the directing faculty member and the faculty coordinator. Students must complete COMM 1190  and major requirements before taking capstone. Permission is required for registration. Prerequisite(s): COMM 1190  AND COMM 1200  AND COMM 2100  AND COMM 2220  AND COMM 2490  AND COMM 2500  AND COMM 3480 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4454 Communication Capstone-Media Studies


    Working closely with individual faculty members and the course coordinator, students will conduct an in-depth communication research study, or create an advanced level communication project in this primary area of their expertise. Students registering for this course must complete a standardized form detailing the capstone project.  The semester long project will be determined by the student and approved by the directing faculty member and the faculty coordinator.  Students must complete COMM 1190 and major requirements before taking capstone.  Permission is required for registration. Permission of the department is required. Prerequisite(s): COMM 1190  , COMM 1200  , COMM 2490  , AND COMM 2220   OR COMM 2240  OR COMM 3200   OR COMM 3280   
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4455 Communication Capstone- Media Production


    Working closely with individual faculty members and the course coordinator, students will conduct an in-depth communication research study, or create an advanced level communication project in this primary area of their expertise. Students registering for this course must complete a standardized form detailing the capstone project.  The semester long project will be determined by the student and approved by the directing faculty member and the faculty coordinator. 

      Permission is required for registration. Prerequisite(s): COMM 1190  ,COMM 2250  ,COMM 2270  ,COMM 2390  ,COMM 3260   or COMM 3310   or COMM 2240    or COMM 2490  , and COMM 4240   or COMM 4250  
    Credits: 3.0

  
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    COMM 4456 Communication Capstone-Theatre and Comedy


    Working closely with individual faculty members and the course coordinator, students will conduct an in-depth communication research study, or create an advanced level communication project in this primary area of their expertise. Students registering for this course must complete a standardized form detailing the capstone project.  The semester long project will be determined by the student and approved by the directing faculty member and the faculty coordinator.  Students must complete COMM 1190 and major requirements before taking capstone.   Permission of department is required. Prerequisite(s): COMM 1190 ,COMM 1020  ,COMM 2740 COMM 2760 COMM 2830 COMM 3770  

     
    Credits: 3.0

  
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    COMM 4457 Comm-Capstone-General


    Working closely with individual faculty members and the course coordinator, students will conduct an in-depth communication research study, or create an advanced level communication project in a primary area of their expertise. Students registering for this course must complete a standardized form detailing the capstone project. The semester long project will be determined by the student and approved by the directing faculty member and the faculty coordinator. Students must complete COMM 1190  and major requirements before taking capstone. Permission is required for registration. Prerequisite(s): COMM 1190 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4470 Strategic Multiplatform Writing


    The course examines styles, techniques and strategies for writing and producing content for online and traditional audiences. Students explore the differences between writing for online versus traditional linear forms. Students will gain an understanding of how to research, plan, writie and develop content effectivelyfor a variety of online and traditional platforms and strategic purposes including: online news and lifestyle media, blogs, corporate web sites, advertising, public relations, marketing and social media. Prerequisite(s): COMM 2100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4480 Public Relations Case Studies


    Case studies of public relations in action are analyzed to identify general principles and strategies that can be applied to the systematic solution of public relations problems and to the creation of public relations opportunities. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3480 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4490 Public Relations Workshop


    This course provides background and practice in developing written communications important in the practice of public relations. Using a workshop format, the course emphasizes planning, writing, and targeting communications designed to influence specific audiences. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3480  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4510 Freelance Writing


    Instruction and supervised practice in nonfiction writing for today’s periodical. Students learn how to analyze market needs, develop ideas suitable for publication, prepare manuscripts, and market what has been written. Prerequisite(s): COMM 2500  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4520 Advanced Broadcast Journalism


    A course aimed at preparing students for work in broadcast news in radio or television. The goal is to polish skills developed in previous journalism courses to a level at or approaching that required to obtain entry-level jobs in broadcast journalism. Students will be charged an additional Communication Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3500  AND COMM 2260  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4540 News Editing


    Prepares students to function as copy editors in the news field. Supervised practice in editing news copy and writing headlines. Use of visual materials and layout of pages. Analysis of various United States newspapers. Prerequisite(s): COMM 2500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4550 Electronic News Gathering


    The investigation, preparation and production of news stories for broadcast. Emphasis on the independent preparation of copy, individual selection of story content and production and video/audio tape for journalistic enterprise. Students refine previously developed skills in writing and editing for broadcast. Individual and group-produced news stories in the field receive feedback from instructor and peers. Programming materials are developed and produced for use on local outlets. Students will be charged an additional Communication Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3500
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4560 Playwriting


    A study and practice in the basic techniques of playwriting. Emphasizes dramatic structure and characterization, developed through the process of writing and revising assignments and drafts of plays. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4590 Journalism Field Study


    Practical application of what is learned in the classroom. Students work at news or public relations jobs on- or off-campus by undertaking special field work assignments in journalism. Prerequisite(s): COMM 2500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4600 Reporting Public Affairs


    The nature and law of public affairs on federal, state, and local levels. The rights of working reporters and the public to matters of legitimate record are outlined, as are the practical steps necessary to gather this information. Prerequisite(s): COMM 2500 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4610 The Dark Side of Interpersonal Communication


    This 3-credit course examines the dark side of interpersonal communication, applying current research. Students in this course will extend introductory knowledge from their foundational coursework by exploring themes such as uncertainty, privacy, relational maintenance, and violence from a communication perspective.   

      Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission Required
    Credits: 3.0

  
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    COMM 4630 Seminar in Group & Team Development


    Students learn and apply theory, strategies and skills of competent team membership in small group problem solving situations that are consistent with professional and social organization settings. Emphasis is placed on developing leadership styles, locating, analyzing and presenting information employing communication information technology. This is a technology intensive course. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3600 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4640 Technology and Society


    Throughout history, communication technologies have allowed people to transcend the limits of face-to-face communication. This course will survey the development of information and communication technologies, with a focus on the impact these technologies have made on communication practices in individual, relational, small group, organizational, cultural, and global contexts.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4650 Managing Interpers Conflict


    When people interact and form relationships, conflicts inevitably emerge. Conflict has both negative and positive consequesnces. The way we manage conflict has a profound effect on our relationships. The purpose of this course is to help students understand the nature of interpersonal conflict and the skills used in constructive conflict management. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3600 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4660 Corp Social Responsibilty


    The course explores the concept(s) of corporate social responsibility (CSR), philanthropy and corporate strategy.  Various real-world organizational CSR programs are analyzed to examine the scope and complexity of CSR and its impact on global and local business and society. 

    This course fulfills UCC - Area 5 Community and Civic Engagement.
    Credits: 3.0

  
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    COMM 4690 Reporting Through Social Media


    This three-credit course examines the varying purposes of social media platforms and teaches students how to report and promote journalism through them. Students will learn how to write effectively across platforms, implement strategies for audience engagement, and communicate in an ethical manner.

    This course in Technology Intensive. This course is resricted to Communication majors ONLY. Prerequisite(s): COMM 2500  
    Credits: 3.0

  
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    COMM 4800 Scene Painting II


    A continuation of the scenic artist’s craft. Advanced techniques, concentrating on the use of aniline dyes, are explored. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3810 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4810 Acting For TV Commercials


    This course provides varied experiences related to rehearsing and performing in television commercials. Prerequisite(s): COMM 1020  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4820 Acting: Showcase


    A directed independent practicum culminating in a public performance.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4830 Children’S Theater


    Study of the educational and artistic modes of contemporary children’s theater. Focuses on styles of presentation and children’s dramatic literature.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    COMM 4990 Independent Study


    As approved and to be arranged through the student’s department advisor.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0

Computer Science

  
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    CS 1300 Introduction To Visual Basic


    Students will be introduced to the basic principles and applications of computing systems, microcomputers in particular. Techniques of computer programming are introduced through the use of VISUAL BASIC. This course is not for computer science majors. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Students will be charged an additional Comp Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 2010 Computer and Information Technology


    The course has two themes. The first theme introduces computer concepts. Topics include hardware and software fundamentals; computer and information systems; data communications and computer networks; World Wide Web and the Internet; social impact of computers including discussions on privacy, security, civil liberty, risk of computers, intellectual properties, and computer related legislations. The second theme familiarizes students with leading applicaton software such as Excel, Powerpoint, Access and Web design programs. Practical computer problem-solving skills are emphasized through intensive hands-on exercises. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Students will be charged an additional Comp Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 2100 Web Page and Site Design


    Introduction to Web page design, Web based multimedia, virtual reality, site management, and non-Web based Internet facilities. Topics include HTML, Javascript, Flash, graphical components, audio, video, online forms, and website maintenance. Review and hands on practice with software packages in each category such as FrontPage, Dreamweaver, and Flash. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Students will be charged an additional Comp Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): CS 2010 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 2120 Computer Graphics and Game Construction


    This course is intended for the student with an interest in computer graphics and games. Fundamentals of game programming in two dimensions will be covered with hands on constructive activities. Types of games will be explored. Graphics programming will be done in a programming language such as Java. Participants in this class will design and run their own game by the conclusion of the course. Prior knowledge of a programming language is required. Topics of study can vary. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 2130 Graphics & Game Construction in Java


    This course introduces students to computer graphics and game design using Java and UML. Fundamentals of game and graphics programming in two dimensions will be covered with hands on constructive activities. Types of games will be explored. Graphics programming will include 2D,3D, and GUI’s. Participants in this class will deign and run their own games by the conclusion of the course. Prior knowledge of a programming language is required. Topics include: UML, prototyping in Alice or Scratch, Java IDE’s, Java basics (assignments, conditionals, loops, arrays, functions, classes, inheritance, threads), Java graphics (Java 2D, 3D, Swing versus AWT), game history, game design (plots, and characters), level design, sprites, animation, collision detection, basic game AI, adding audio/music, and integrating all components in an effective, adaptive, and playable game. Prerequisite(s): Prior knowledge of a programming language is required.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 2150 Computer and Information Technology For Educators


    This course is designed to meet the ISTE National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers. It introduces the concepts, the skill, and the capabilities necessary to effectively use computers and information technology. With an emphasis on fundamentals, students can easily adapt to the rapid change of computing technologies. The basic concepts include hardware and software fundamentals, telecommunications computer networking, electronic media, and data processing. The legal, ethical, cultural, and societal issues related to technology are also discussed. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Students will be charged an additional Comp Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 2250 Web Pages and Site Design


    Introduction to Web page design, Web based multimedia, virtual reality, site management, and non-Web based Internet facilities. Topics include HTML, Javascript, Flash, graphical components, audio, video, online forms, and website maintenance. Review and hands on practice with software packages in each category such as FrontPage, Dreamweaver, and Flash. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite(s): CS 2010 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 2300 Computer Science I


    This course is the foundation course for the Computer Science program which is one of the most high-technology academic curriculums. The topics include algorithimic approaches to computer problem solving and programming methodology. analyisis, design, writing , compilation, execution, documentation, implementation, debugging, and evaluation of a computer program with procedural abstraction and baisc data representation. Substantial programming assignments ( in aNSI C/C++ language) is emphasized, including problem solving in numerical, applied to mathematical, science, business and other areas as well as non-numerical applications. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Students will be charged an additional Comp Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1150  OR MATH 1350 
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    CS 2350 Fundamentals of Computer Hardware


    This course is intended for non-computer science major students with an interest in computer hardware. The course presents the fundamentals of modern computer systems in terms of structure and function. Hands-on experience complements lectures. Major topics are: hardware components (chips, CPU, BIOS, and chipsets technologies, motherboard/expansion board design basics, peripherals, busses, ports, magnetic and optical storage devices, I/O) systems configuration, partitioning, formatting, and hardware aspects and support in Windows and Linux; booting; hardware; management/maintenance; performance assessment and improvement; troubleshooting problems. This course encompasses the A+ certification material in hardware. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite(s): CS 2010  OR CS 2150 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 2400 Computer Science II


    The course is a continuation of CS 2300 . it focuses on object-oriented programming (OOP) and UNIX technologies. Main topics covered int he courses include: procedural abstraction, data representation, recursion, and program modularity. File processing, data management, and storage allocation techniques. Abstract data type (ADT) and object-oriented programming techniques. Key concepts in software design. Multidimensional arrays, strings, pointers, and records. Students complete programming assignments in C++. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Students will be charged an additional Comp Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): CS 2300 
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    CS 2420 Object-Oriented Progr in Java


    A second course in program design, using Java and Object-oriented analysis and design with UML. Topics include: Review of Java fundamentals (importing, assignments, strings, input/output, conditionals, loops, arrays, functions), recursion, abstract data type (ADT), objects/classes, inheritance, polymorphism, generics, file processing, exception handling, event-driven programming, GUI and graphics (Java 2D, Swing versus AWT), multi-threading and UNIX basics with X-Windows. Programming projects will be assigned in Java in Windows and UNIX. Prerequisite(s): CS 2300 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 2500 C, Unix and Software Desgn


    This course is an introduction to the principles of software design and development methodology. The course will familiarize the student with the programming language C, and the UNIX operating system environment. They will also be familiarized with advanced software design and support tools. Software performance measures and concurrent programming methods will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): CS 2400 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 2530 Cobol I


    Introduction to the COBOL language with applications to commercial problems. Topics in business information processing such as payroll and inventory management are examined. Students will be charged an additional Comp Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 2550 Information Systems


    This course introduces the concepts and methods used in the analysis, design, and implementation of computerized information systems. Major topics include software life cycle, data and process models, basic database design, logical and physical design, prototyping, architecture, and project management in information systems development. The course covers hardware, software, databases, communications, networking, and the Internet in support of the information systems infrastructure in an organization. A significant systems development project is included in this course. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite(s): (CS 1300  OR CS 2300 ) AND (CS 2010  OR CS 2150 )
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 2600 Discrete Structures


    Topics include elementary propositional and predicate logics; elementary set theory; relations and their properties; functions; congruences and Euclidean algorithm; combinatorics; mathematical reasoning; matrices; elements of graph theory; trees and their applications. Some programming is required. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Students will be charged an additional Comp Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): CS 2300 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 2800 Computer and Assembler Language


    Structure of digital computers and machine language. Data representation, instruction formats and addressing techniques. Symbolic coding, assembly systems, and programming techniques. System stack, procedure calls, and program segmentation and linkage. Interrupts and I/O. Memory organization and addressing. Program translation and system programs: assemblers, compilers, interpreters, preprocessors, linkers, loaders, and debuggers. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Students will be charged an additional Comp Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): CS 2300 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 3300 Linear Programming and Operations Research


    An introduction to the concept of operations research and mathematical techniques applied to decision problems when the inputs are known. Topics include linear, nonlinear and dynamic programming with applications to transportation, assignment, resource allocation, production scheduling and inventory problems. Prerequisite(s): CS 2400  AND CS 2600 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 3350 Fundamentals of Computer Networking


    This course is intended for the non-CS major student with an interest in computer networking. The course presents the fundamentals of data communication and computer networking. Major topics include state-of-the-art local and wide area networking technologies; layered internetworking architecture; TCP/IP protocal suite and the Internet; networking standards and standard organizations; network security, privacy, management, and administration; network applications emphasizing the Internet; networking industry; social impact of networking; and trends and emerging technologies such as the increasingly popular mobile and wireless data communication. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite(s): CS 2350 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 3380 Fundmentals of Networking and Information assurance and security


    This course builds a deeper understanding of how networks work, including the topics of LANs, WANs, service providers, packets, hubs, routers, switches, physical layers, and Internet protocols. It also introduces students to information assurance and security with a major focus on the following information security and information system technologies categories: firewall, remote access protection, access controls, vulnerability assessment, penetration testing, forensics and anti-forensics, client security, perimeter defense, server security, intrusion detection, network security, and cyber defense. Students will be charged an additional Comp Sci Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.  Prerequisite(s): CS 2400  or CS 2420  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 3400 System Administration


    Fundamental principles, problem solving, and best practices in configuring, integrating, upgrading, diagnosing, and managing computer systems software in stand-alone, networked, and multi-user contexts. Topics include: operating system fundamentals, understanding boot mechanism, system and device installation/configuration, user support, shell and Perl scripting for automating/facilitating management, systems services, applications software installation and support, security policies and practices, backup procedures, disaster recovery, establishing networking contexts, client-server issues, maintenance, operating system performance tuning, emulation, virtualization, multi-booting, multi-core & multi-processor load balancing, distributed computing, cloud computing environments, and current issues. Windows and Linux with X-Windows will be the primary platforms for exploration, hands-on work and preparation for certification exams.
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    CS 3410 Digital Logic and Computer Organization


    This course introduces the principles of design and analysis of digital components found in digital systems. It also discusses the design of functional units and how these units are organized into a computer system. Other topics such as typical architectures of computer systems, VLSI technology, and digital design software tools are also introduced. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Students will be charged an additional Comp Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): CS 2600  AND CS 2800 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 3420 Data Structure


    Concepts and implementations of lists, stacks, queues, trees, graphs, sorting and searching algorithms, hashing, memory management, and advanced data structure applications using object-oriented technology. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Students will be charged an additional Comp Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): CS 2400  AND CS 2600 
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    CS 3450 Operating Systems


    A course in operating systems with a system software perspective. Topics include computer system over-view; history, evolution, and philosophies; tasking and processes; process coordination and synchronization; scheduling and dispatch; physical and virtual memory organization; device managment; file systems and naming; security and protection; communications and networking; distributed operating systems; and real time concerns. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Students will be charged an additional Comp Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): CS 2800  AND CS 3420 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 3500 Software Engineering


    This course provides a hands-on experience with the issues and techniques of software engineering. A team project applying the techniques covered is the main focus of the course. This course introduces the fundamental princples and practices of the software development process to produce quality software sytems. Several developmental paradigms, processes, models and methods will be discussed. The topics cover the entire software lfecycle that includes requirement analysis and specification, design, implementation, testing, integration, maintenance/evolution, documentation, and project management. The course also introduces APIs, CASE tools and environments, as well as the UML (Unified Modeling Language). Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite(s): CS 2550  or CS 3420 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 3550 Data Management Concepts and Applications


    This course provides an overview of data organization, data management, and data manipulation by applications. It explores the enterprise perspective of managing data. The student learns data integrity, data models, security, database integration, and various database administration issues. A significant data management project in query processing within a database environment is included in this course. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite(s): CS 2550 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 3720 Design and Analysis Algorithms


    An introduction to the concepts, methodologies, and constructive models for formulating algorithms. Use of analytic techniques to determine the relative efficiency of algorithms with respect to several measures such as time and space complexity. Later topics introduce alternate models of computation such as probabilistic algorithms, parallel processing, and complexity classes (such as NP). Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite(s): CS 3420  AND MATH 3240 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 3820 Programming Languages


    Design issues relevant to the implementation of programming languages. Topics include in-depth study and comparison of mechanisms for sequence control, data structure implementation and run-time storage management; conceptual study of programming language syntax, semantics, and translation; survey of major programming paradigms including procedural, functional, object-oriented, and logical; introduction to language constructs that support distributed and parallel computing. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite(s): CS 2800  AND CS 3420 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 3900 CIT Work Experience


    This course inculcates and reinforces professionalism, high standards of ethical deportment/character, productivity, and work experience in Computer Information Technology profession. This course requires successful completion of one of the following criteria in a CIT context for a minimum span of one semester: prior work experience, Student Technology Consultant (working for the Instruction & Research Technology office at WPUNJ), CS lab team work (with CS/CIT activities as assigned by the CS Lab Coordinator in the CS/CIT Department at WPUNJ), or completion of CS 3950  
    Credits: .0
  
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    CS 3950 Computer Information Systems Internship


    This course provides field experience in the Computer Information Systems profession. An agency provides the environment and general supervision during the experience while a faculty member meets with the student on an ongoing basis to relate the field experience to the Computer Information Systems profession. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite(s): CS 2550 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 3990 Selected Topics


    The course covers current topics of interest and importance in computer science that are not covered in any other course. The precise topics to be covered in this course are announced in the semester prior to the offering of the course. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0
  
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    CS 4020 Numerical Methods


    An introduction to numerical approximation methods and their analysis. Topics include non-linear equation solution, iterative methods, sets of equations, relaxation methods, interpolation, splines, numerical differentiation and integration, Euler’s method, curve fitting, and function approximation. The algorithmic design approach is emphasized. Course offered Spring Semester only. Prerequisite(s): CS 2600  AND MATH 1610 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 4040 Computer Simulation


    Theory, programming methodology, algorithm design, and practical applications of computer simulation. Topics include: modeling of deterministic systems, stochastic systems, generation of random variables and distributions, queuing models, collection and analysis of statistics from runs. Applications in computer system and network design and performance. Assigned projects concentrate on programming simulation models using C/C++ and simulation languages such as GPSS or SIMSCRIPT. Course offered Fall Semester only. Prerequisite(s): CS 3420 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 4050 Systems Programming


    The course familiarizes the student with the organization, system libraries, and tools for software development in the Unix system. The student should leave this course with the ability to use system level facilities provided by Unix. Course offered Fall Semester only. Prerequisite(s): CS 3450 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 4051 Internet Applications With Java


    This course introduces Internet-based applications development with Java technology. Topics include GUI components, threads, concurrent programming, networking, Java Database connectivity (JDBC), Servlets, JavaServer Pages (JSP), JavaBeans, Enterprise JavaBeans, and Mobile Devices. Prerequisite(s): CS 3820 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 4100 Artificial Intelligence


    A study of classical and modern approaches to artificial intelligence including knowledge representation, search strategies, inference systems, logic programming, list processing, machine learning, natural language processing, and neural nets. Exercises in programming using current tools, COMMON LISP, or PROLOG. Students will be charged an additional Comp Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): MATH 324 or MATH 3240  and CS 342 or CS 3420  with grades of C- or better. Course offered Spring Semester only.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 4200 Compiler Construction


    An in-depth study of the principles and design aspects of programming language translation. The major components of a compiler are discussed: lexical analysis, syntactic analysis, semantics routines, and code generation. Alternative parsing strategies are presented and compared with respect to space and time tradeoffs. Course offered Fall Semester only. Prerequisite(s): CS 3820 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 4201 Database Driven Web Applications


    This course introduces the fundamentals of database-driven web applications as well as the programming technologies and techniques used to build them. Topics include extended coverage of HTML, JavaScript, Web server administration, database concepts, VB .NET, ASP.NET, and PHP.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 4250 Computer and Network Security


    This course provides a comprehensive and balanced coverage of the basic concepts, principles, and practices of computer and network security. Topics include vulnerabilities of computer and information systems; privacy and integrity of information; security goals, policies, planning, implementation, and administration; legal and ethical issues security. Closely integrated into the above topics are technologies used to secure systems including access controls, cryptographic algorithms and tools; public key infrastructure and certificates for entity authentication; firewalls; VPNs;; intrusion detection and prevention systems.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 4300 Data Communications and Computer Networks


    Topics include basic concepts, principles, design procedures, and applications of data communication systems. ISO reference model for open system interconnection is used as the basis to discuss the functions and protocols of layered network structures. Also introduced are the evolutions trends of networking technologies, various types of networks from LAN to WAN, internetworking architectures, network security, management, and applications. Course offered Spring Semester only. Prerequisite(s): CS 3410  AND CS 3450 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 4400 Data Base Management


    Topics include data collection, representation, modeling, and storage; file versus database approach to data management; database environment; principles of logical and physical database design. Emphasis is placed on Entity-Relationship and relational data models. Other topics include client-server environment, database security and integrity, and database administration. A substantial project on the design and implementation of a database is assigned. Course offered Fall Semester only. Students will be charged an additional Comp Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): CS 3420 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 4410 Computer Architecture


    An introduction to the architecture of digital computer systems. Structures of systems using processors memories, input/output devices, and interfaces as building blocks. Computer system instruction set design and implementation, including memory hierarchies and pipe-lining. Parallel processing and computer networking. Course offered Spring Semester only. Prerequisite(s): CS 3410  AND CS 3450 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 4450 Theory of Computation


    This course investigates formal machine models of computation, formal languages, and computability. This includes finite state automata, pushdown automata, Turing machines, languages and grammars, and how they are useful within computer science. Course offered Spring Semester only. Prerequisite(s): CS 3420 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 4610 Computer Graphics


    A rigorous study of concepts, theory, and algorithmic aspects of two and three dimensional computer graphics. Topics include graphics hardware and programming, file formats, algorithms for curves and image generation, splines, transformations, perspectives, illumination, shading, depth, solid-modeling, ray-tracing, animation, fractalization, texturing, and alternate rendering models. Programming in both general-purpose and ray-tracing languages. Course offered Fall Semester only. Students will be charged an additional Comp Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): CS 3420 
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 4700 Cloud Computing


    A rigorous study of the fundamental concepts, principles, and practices in the establishment, programming, and effective administration/management in Cloud Computing. We will review how Infrastructure, Software, and Platform are Services in various cloud models, modern aggregate and distributed computer systems, and networking. Analytic aspects for inquiry and critical assessment include several models
    of performance, scheduling, resource allocation, scalability, cost, configuration, maintenance, trouble-shooting, privacy, security, monitoring, availability, energyefficiency, and legal issues in the creation and application of cloud platforms. This course will focus on the theory, principles, algorithms, practices, applicationsprogrammingin, trade-offs and problem-solving in Cloud Computing, including hands on
    laboratory experiments and homework projects using preexisting clouds, specifically from Amazon, Google, and Microsoft. Case studies will be drawn from businesscontexts (IBM, Yahoo, Twitter, Facebook), scientific computation, and databases.  Students will be expected to set-up and explore several virtual machine models (in both Windows and Linux) and very small-scale clouds using OpenStack as part of the projectwork.
    Several programs will be written to run on these clouds both in class and as homework. Prerequisite(s): CS 3420  with a grade of C-  or CS 3380  or CS 3400  System Administration or permission of instructor
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 4800 Computer Science Seminar


    This is the capstone course required of all computer science majors. The course is conducted in seminar form featuring internal as well as external speakers. Approximately two-thirds of the course covers current topics of interest in computer science and computing technology; the remaining one-third of the course is dedicated to social impact of computers and ethical issues faced by today’s computer professionals. Students are required to select a relevant topic and complete a substantial research-oriented project either individually or as a team. As the end of the project, students are expected to submit a substantial written report and orally present it to the public. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Students will be charged an additional Comp Science Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    CS 4900 Computer Science Senior Project


    This course provides qualified students an opportunity to work with faculty members in research and development projects in areas of current interest in Computer Science. Students are expected to carry out a meaningful project to be reviewed and approved by a panel of advisors. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.
    Credits: 3.0 - 6.0
  
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    CS 4950 Computer Science Internship


    This course provides a field experience in the Computer Science profession. An agency provides the environment and general supervision during the experience while a faculty member meets with the student on an ongoing basis to relate the field experience to the Computer Science profession. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.
    Credits: 1.0 - 3.0
 

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