Jul 05, 2020  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog

Courses


 

Africana World Studies

  
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    AWS 2000 African World Literature Analysis


    This course focuses on literary modes and concepts of orature and literature rooted in African and African diaspora aesthetic and philosophical traditions. It also provides a study of African-language and African-derived linguistic experimentations with received European languages in world black texts, African-world literary theory and critical approaches to oral and written materials and colonialist criticism. Special attention will be paid to methods of fieldwork in orature, print and electronic research, critical analysis, research writing and bibliography.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2010 African Civilizations


    This is a survey of African civilizations from earliest times to the end of the 19th century. The course focuses on the socio-economic, political and cultural heritages of African peoples in the lower Nile Valley, the highlands of Ethiopia, the savanna grasslands and forest regions of West Africa, the central African Plateau, and the East African coast. Special attention is given to the interaction of these civilizations with other parts of the world to the end of the nineteenth century.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2030 Fundamentals of African World Studies


    Introduces students to the global nature of African, African American, and Caribbean Studies as an academic discipline. Deals with the history and theory of the field, its institutionalization, and its various dimensions and intellectual traditions. Attention is given both to its relationship with the academy and its relevance and involvement with world communities of color. Exposes students to major texts, scholars, and thinkers representing issues in the field and prepares AWS majors for an informed choice of academic program and career options. Cross Listed Course(s): AACS 100 AWS 203
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2040 Literature Harlem Renaissance


    This is a course that studies the historical, artistic, and political movement centered in Harlem, New York from the 1910s to the mid 1930s commonly referred to as the Harlem Renaissance. It investigates the diasporic connections between Harlem and both Africa and the Caribbean. In addition, it emphasizes the contributions of women writers to a movement traditionally seen as a largely male preserve. Further, it investigates the fraught relationship between race, sexuality, and artistic expression. Readings may include texts by Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Countee Cullen, Alain Locke, W.E.B. Du Bois, James Weldon Johnson, and others. This is a Writing Intensive course. Cross Listed Course(s): ENG 2500  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2050 Research in African World Studies


    This course introduces students to methodological approaches and strategies of research, including field work, on the Africana World experience.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2060 French Colonial Legacies


    This course offers an inrtroduction to the historical and cultural diversity of various- primarily non-European-French-speaking regions of the world. It discusses French colonialism and its distinct and complex legacies in different areas of sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, North America, Indo-China, the Caribbean, and France itself. Through historical, literary, and clultural readings and cinema, this course traces the effects of colonization on both the colonizer and the colonized, including its particular impact on women and children; thus grappling with issues of power and oppression, sexism, race and gender, enslavement and inequality, and justice and freedom. Taught in English.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2070 Racism and Mass Media


    Examines the history and roles of blacks and other racial-ethnic groups in the American media, focusing, in particular, on the role of racism and ethnocentrism in their experiences, as well as on how they are portrayed.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2080 Postcolonial African World Literatures


    The course examines the current literary theories and critical approaches implicit in the concepts of the postcolonial as applied to Continental and African-diaspora texts. We shall focus on core texts originally written or spoken in African languages, English, and French, with special emphasis on their specific ethnic mythologies, languages, knowledge and memory systems, aesthetic and discursive principles. The course also raises fundamental questions about the colonization and extradition of black and non-western literatures in the Euroacademy under the rubics of “New Literatures in English” and “Francophone Literature.”
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2090 African Oral Epic Performance


    This course explores the multi-generic composition of the African cosaan, or oral “epic,” which combines several forms including narrative, song, praise poetry, theater, music and historical oratory. Using a comparative approach, the course will examine aesthetic issues of orality, performance, the written word, interactions between music and voice, poetry and prose narrative forms. The performance-texts will be augmented by field recordings and, when possible, in-class demonstrations by a professional griot.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2110 Blues to Rap and Hip Hop


    Explores the African-American oral-cultural tradition from the Blues (Delta, Texas, Memphis, Piedmont), Urban Blues (Classic, Kansas City, Rhythm and Blues), Funk, Soul, Disco, New Jack Swing to Rap and Hip-Hop. Focus will be on its evolution and development as a cultural art form. Within this context, its relevance and impact will be examined relative to the African-American experience and how this music has helped to shape and define African-American culture in particular and American culture in general.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2120 African American Music


    The music of Africa and that of African Americans has become interwoven with that of the Americas. This course provides students with a better knowledge and understanding of the evolution and development of African American music and its various forms and styles from African Roots to Spirituals, Work Songs, Blues, Gospel, Jazz, Rhythm and Blues (Funk, Soul, etc.), Latin (Afro-Cuban, Samba, Meringue, etc.), Reggae, Fusion, and Rap/Hip-Hop, within a sociocultural and historical context.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2130 African, African American, and Caribbean Theater


    An exploration of the African, African American and Caribbean experience through the medium of theatre.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2140 African American Family Life


    An introduction to the sociocultural and historical traditions that have survived and aided in the survival of the African American family, as well as those various forces that have continuously eroded its social fabric and stability. It offers theoretical exposition of the nature and features of the black family with comparative concepts and practices of love, marriage, divorce, illegitimacy, homosexuality, and other aspects of the black family.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2150 Africa & World Since 1885


    This survey of African history from 1885 to the present examines the European scramble and partition of Africa, the impact of European conquest and colonialism, African responses to colonial rule, the process of decolonization, and the achievement of African independence. It ends with a consideration of the legacy of European colonialism after independence, African responses to the Cold War, and the current state of African societies as they endeavor to develop economically in a changing global environment.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2250 Race,Gender and Social Justice


    This course analyzes multiple forms of social oppression and inequality based on race (and color), sex (and gender), sexual orientation (and identity), and class in the United States. It will examine systemic aspects of social oppression in different periods and contexts and the ways that systems of social oppression manifest themselves on individual, cultural, institutional and/or global levels thus becoming self-perpetuating but not wholly unaltered structures. Individual and group agency, strategies of resistance, and visions for change will also be studied. Cross Listed Course(s): WGS 2250  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2330 Arts of Africa


    This course examines the arts of Western and Sub-Saharan Africa, from its earliest moments to the modern era. We will study expressive wooden sculptures, fine golden objects, elaborate textiles, and colorful wall paintings, locating them in their social and ritual contexts. As we explore the diversity of African art, we will also examine its transformation in New World contexts such as Cuba, Haiti, and Brazil. Using the Ben Shahn Gallery’s Joan and Gordon Tobias Collection of African Art, we will have direct experience with African objects. This course is Writing Intensive. Cross Listed Course(s): ARTH 2330  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2410 African American History to 1865


    After a survey of the African heritage, including slavery, a study is made of the history of people of African descent in their New World environment. The role of African-Americans in the development of the United States to the Civil War is examined. Cross Listed Course(s): HIST 2410  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2420 African American History Since 1865


    Beginning with an examination of the period of Reconstruction, the course explores the various survival tactics of African Americans and the effects of governmental and societal action or inaction on their lives up to the present.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2440 African American Politics


    An examination and analysis of the political power structure and relationships in the black community. Emphasis is on those factors that make black communities relatively powerless and how this state of powerlessness can be ameliorated. Particular attention is paid to black political interaction in New Jersey. Cross Listed Course(s): POL 2280  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2530 American Slavery


    This course examines the institution of American Slavery from the introduction of African slaves in North America to the Emancipation and aftermath of the American Civil War. It focuses on the political, economic, and social institutions supporting slavery as a system of racial and class oppression. Special attention is paid to the life and culture of the enslaved Blacks, patterns of resistance and rebellion, and gender dynamics of slavery. The course closes with an examination of the legacy of slavery as a sysem of oppression and surveys major strategies and movements that have sought to redress its impact on contemporary America Prerequisite(s): HIST 2530
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2550 The Black Woman Experience


    This course examines historical and contemporary issues relevant to the black woman. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the experiences and representations of the black woman and her historical presence in the United States from a variety of black scholarly perspectives. Through oral histories, historical and biographical readings, written and oral assignments, and class discussions students will review and analyze intellectual, cultural, political, social, and psychological issues that have shaped and defined black women’s lives. Students will demonstrate an understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations by evaluating online content and by creating a web-based presentation on research conducted about the lives of black women. Cross Listed Course(s): WGS 2550  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2610 African, African American, and Caribbean Religions


    Course describes and analyzes the character of the African, African-American, and Caribbean religious life, both institutionalized and informal. Focus is on the origins, connectedness and divergences of various religious traditions and practices in Africa and in the diaspora (e.g., Santeria, Candomble, Vodun). Attention is also given to the role of religion in the survival and struggles of peoples of African origin.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2620 Caribbean Women:Cultr and Soc


    An anthropological exploration of women in Caribbean society, using mainly ethnographic source materials. The source focuses on the similarities and differences in the social, economic and political experiences of various Caribbean women, from slavery through the 20th century. Particular attention is given to the experiences of Haitian, Cuban, Jamaican, Dominican, and Puerto Rican women. Cross Listed Course(s): LAS 2620  LAS 2620  WGS 2980  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2800 Minority Enterprises


    Analysis and evaluation of the structure, patterns, and problems of minority-owned or operated enterprises. Emphasis is on ways and means by which these businesses can be improved both quantitatively and qualitatively.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2910 History of Civil Rights


    Drawing on interviews, speeches, autobiographies, film and monograms, this course examines the history of the Civil Rights movement in the United States.  Attention is given to African Americans and Whites who fought to dismantle segregation in the South and the North as well as to the masses of Whites and their leaders who fought to reassert segregationist policies and practices.  The course examines the role of Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Rosa Parks, and other Civil Rights leaders.  Finally, the course examines the policies and practices of the executive, legislative and judiciary branches of the federal and local governments as they impacted African Americans and the Civil Rights Movement.
      3.0 Prerequisite(s): UCC Area 3 Historical Perspectives Cross Listed Course(s): HIST 2910  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 2980 Student Community Service


    Students have the opportunity to complement and coordinate their academic work with community service, encompassing internships, training, or short-term assignments in student teaching, social work, teaching, and recreational, and cultural enrichment programs. The course involves working with selected agencies and organized urban groups.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3010 W Africa in Atlantic World


    The course locates West Africa within the Atlantic World which is a large geographic region made up of four continents that surround the Atlantic Ocean. Viewing West Africa as part of the Atlantic World offers unique opportunities to transcend the constraints of national histories and focus on broader issues such as mercantilism, empire building, voluntary and involuntary migration of millions of Europeans and Africans to the Americas, and the cross-cultural influences of such migrations. In regard to the latter the course specifically looks at the hitherto neglected Islamic influences in the Americas due to the importation of West African slaves.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3020 Eastern Africa and the Indian Ocean World


    This course explores the integration of Eastern Africa in the Indian Ocean World (IOW). We shall trace the emergence of an IOW through the development of oceanic trade relations as far back as the ancient civilizations of the Ancient Middle East and Indus Valley. We shall then consider the connection of Eastern Africa to this world based on the “discovery” of the regime of monsoon winds that governed sailing in the Indian Ocean; the rise and expansion of Islam throughout the IOW; the various migrations, diasporas, and networks that connect different peoples and places; and the different responses of the peoples of the IOW to European imperialism, from the Portuguese to the British. By looking at the history of Eastern Africa as part of the IOW, we will also be questioning the notion of globalization as a modern phenomenon.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3030 African Family Life


    Traces and examines the origin and development of the African family system, marriage, sex, and child rearing. Focus is also on the primacy of the family in African traditional life.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3040 African Caribbean History


    Examines the history of the Caribbean, starting with slavery, colonization, and the evolution of distinctly African Caribbean society, culture, and personality.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3050 Community Development


    Analyzes the nature of African American communities, their origins, institutional structures, and cultural characteristics, and evaluates their role in community development or underdevelopment. Emphasis is on how local communities can increase their capacity to plan and effect social, political, and economic change to improve the quality of life for African American peoples. Focus is on communities both in New Jersey (Paterson, Newark) and elsewhere.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3100 Race, Class and Gender in Colonial Africa


    Presentation and analysis of differing points of view on current topics in African-American studies and scholarship.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3110 Studies in Africana-World Literature


    A variable content course designed to provide detailed historical and theoretical studies of African-world literary traditions from the Old Kingdom to the present. Using the methods of comparative literature, the course focuses on one or more selected topics such as postcolonial literature, aesthetic ideology, influence, gender, genre formation, literary periods, literary movements, literature, and the other arts and oral traditions.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3120 Major Authors of African Descent


    In-depth study of one or more outstanding black authors from Africa, the Caribbean, and the Americas or masterpieces by such authors. Emphasis is on the distinguishing aesthetic and ideological qualities of the texts and their defining contributions to the traditions in which they belong. Authors include Nobel Prize winners such as Toni Morrison, Wole Soyinka, Derek Walcott, and other promiment writers like Wilson Harris, Chinua Achebe, L. S. Senghor, Simon Schwartz-Bart, and Ralph Ellison.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3140 Toni Morrison and Africanist Persona


    This course is a detailed study of Toni Morrison’s art and the African and African-American traditions out of which she writes. The class examines the mythic structures of African/ethnic memory that govern form and theme in Morrison’s work in terms of aesthetic theories located in black expressive cultures such as music, myth, oral history, slave narrative, and family history. Special attention is placed on what Morrison calls “the Africanist Persona,” the conscious and unconscious African retentions, Kongo, Yoruba and Angolan memory and knowledge systems embedded in selected novels.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3160 Islam in Sub-Saharan Africa


    This course will explore how Islam spread from Arabia into Africa. The main focus will be on Sudanic West Africa and Eastern Africa. More specifically, the seminar will examine the factors which facilitated the spread of Islam in Africa, what African conversion to Islam meant, how Muslims have historically related with non-Muslims, and how Muslims experienced European colonial rule in the 19th and 20th centuries. We will read several texts written by African Muslims of the 16th through the 20th centuries, in addition to the work of historians, anthropologists, and others who have addressed the history of Africa’s Muslims
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3170 Chinua Achebe and the African Narrative


    This course is an in-depth study of Chinua Achebe’s oeuvre, placed in the contexts of African oral prose narratives, modern literary theories and Achebe scholarship. The course also covers Achebe’s fictional and non-fictional responses to the literature of empire and his critical essays on African/lgbo art, culture, politics, oratory and colonialist criticism, which, together, inform the aesthetics of his work.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3210 Haiti: Its History, People, and Culture


    Analysis of Haitian society and culture, both before and after the Revolution, to ascertain the nature and level of social transformation during the period of sovereignty and an examination of the impact of United States intervention on Haitian independence and development. In addition, the particular features of Haitian culture and its connectedness with its African cultural past are analyzed in light of the folk-elite and color-class contradiction that continue to characterize Haitian society and politics. Cross Listed Course(s): LAS 3230  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3220 Studies in African-Caribbean Literature


    A selected survey of major twentieth-century writers from the English-speaking Caribbean, such as V.S. Naipul, George Lamming, Derek Walcott, Edgar Mittelholzer, Samuel Selvon, Jamaica Kincaid, and others. The works of these authors are explored for the light they throw on Caribbean society and culture, as well as for the unique features, if any, of Caribbean literature: essays, drama, poetry, and fiction.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3240 African Communities and Cultures in the New World


    Survey of the African diaspora in the New World, including an examination of the survival, retention, and development of vital and enduring cultural forms and social organization, created by peoples of African origin. A diachronic approach to understanding the African and New World cultural interaction as dynamic and creative response to forced migration and labor exploitation.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3280 Studies in African-American Literature


    The African-American experience as depicted in literature by and about African Americans. Focuses on biographies, autobiographies, and fiction.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3380 African Politics


    Deals with post-independence governmental political parties and ideological inclinations among African states. Emphasis is on the origin and evolution of political institutions and their function within contemporary Africa. Cross Listed Course(s): POL 3390  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3410 Contemporary Caribbean Societies


    Examines the major problems facing the Caribbean today. The focus is on the present factors affecting the development of Caribbean societies and the difficulties confronting national and regional efforts to transform their economies. The basic economic, political, and cultural features of the Caribbean are defined and analyzed. Attention is also given to initiatives at regional integration as well as changing United States-Caribbean relations. Cross Listed Course(s): LAS 3420  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3520 African American Poetry


    Critically studies African American poetry, including vernacular forms.  Identifies formal elements of poetry while attending to the political and historical contexts of the writing.  Authors may include Wheatley, Horton, Hammon, F.E.W. Harper, DuBois, J.W. Johnson, Dunbar, Hughes, McKay, Toomer, Spencer, G.D. Johnson, Brooks, Jones, M. Harper, Hayden, Jordan, Reed, Giovanni, Sanchez, Clifton, Mullen, Alexander, and Komunyakaa.  Vernacular forms studied may include spirituals, work songs, sermons, the blues, gospel, jazz, and hip hop.
      Cross Listed Course(s): ENG 3520
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3580 Psychology of African Americans


    Examines traditional schools of psychology as they pertain to the psychological experience of African Americans. Alternative psychological considerations relative to the African-American experience, including those advanced by noted African-American psychologists, are also explored. Cross Listed Course(s): PSY 3580  
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 3990 Selected Topics


    A subject not covered by an existing course will be offered as recommended by the department and approved by the dean.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0
  
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    AWS 4000 The Black Experience in the Film Medium


    An anthropological and historical exploration of the film industry in America as one of the primary avenues used to create derogatory images of African Americans. Attention is given to possible correlations between the depiction of African Americans in film and their changing social/economic/political status.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 4010 African-American Social Thought


    The development of African American social thought in the nineteenth century regarding the nature of being and the circumstances and fortunes of peoples of African descent. Includes the ideas of David Walker, Martin Delaney, Frederick Douglas, W.E. Dubois, Marcus Garvey, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Stokely Carmichael, Bayard Rustin, Amiri Baraka, and Molefi Asante. Cross Listed Course(s): AACS 401 AWS 401
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 4020 Pan-Africanism and the Black Experience


    An analysis of Pan-Africanism as a social movement, its origins, objectives, strategies, leadership, and followers. Concern is with the philosophy of the movement as a bridging or integrating framework for bringing together continental Africans and Africans in the diaspora in a common and collective exercise.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 4200 Economic Structure of the Black Community


    Beginning with an introduction to economics, the course focuses on the economic relations between the inner city and the rest of the economy.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 4800 Internship in Africana World Studies


    Provides a culturally sensitive, intensive, and practical capstone experience in work settings, primarily concerned with activities bearing on the lives of racial and ethnic “minorities.” Through supervised work assignments with sponsoring agencies, students observe and participate in the day-to-day tasks of these organizations, and keep organized and detailed journals of their experience for analysis and a final report. Major student outcomes include: application of data collection and analysis techniques, improved ability to think critically, enhanced writing and oral skills, strengthening of interpersonal skills, and sharpened theoretical and practical understanding of human service delivery systems.
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    AWS 4980 Seminar in Africana World Studies


    A comprehensive analysis of a specialized topic in African, African American, and Caribbean Studies. The objective is to provide an opportunity for a capstone experience for junior and senior students to focus on a major problem in the discipline, work cooperatively with others, sharpen their analytical and critical thinking, and enhance their writing and oral abilities. At least one seminar is offered each academic year. Students may take more than one seminar.
    Credits: 3.0

Biology

  
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    BIO 1120 General Anatomy and Physiology I


    A study of the structural and functional relationships of the human body. First semester: detailed study of the individual organism, cell functions, histology, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, respiratory, and circulatory systems. Second semester: nervous, endocrine, reproductive, urinary, and digestive, systems. First-semester laboratory: dissection of the cat, human skeleton. Second semester: nervous, endocrine, reproductive, digestive, and urinary systems; metabolism, acid-base balance, and water and electrolyte balance.  Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): Must be enrolled in one of the following programs: Nursing General BS, Nursing RN BS, Athletic Training BS, Exercise Science BS, Physical Education K-12 Certification BS, and Physical Education K-12 with Health Certification BS.
     
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    BIO 1130 General Anatomy and Physiology II


    A study of the structural and functional relationships of the human body. First semester: detailed study of the individual organism, cell functions, histology, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, respiratory and circulatory systems. Second semester: nervous, endocrine, reproductive, urinary and digestive systems. First-semester laboratory: dissection of the cat, human skeleton. Second semester: nervous, endocrine, reproductive, digestive and urinary systems; metabolism, acid-base balance and water and electrolyte balance. Required of nursing and public health majors, and students planning to obtain a degree in physical therapy. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 1120 
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    BIO 1140 Applied Anatomy and Physiology


    A study of human anatomy and physiology with emphasis on developing an understanding of the interrelationships of the body systems in maintaining homeostasis in both health and disease. Emphasis on nervous and endocrine control mechanisms and the muscular and respiratory systems. Required of psychology and speech pathology majors; open to others. Not open to biology/biotechnology majors, or students who have taken any of the following courses: BIO 1120 , BIO 1130 , BIO 1180 , or BIO 1190 . Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    BIO 1180 Basic Anatomy and Physiology I


    A study of human anatomy and physiology with emphasis on developing an understanding of the interrelationships of the body systems in maintaining homeostasis in both health and disease. Emphasis on nervous and endocrine control mechanisms and the muscular and respiratory systems. Required of psychology, public health, kinesiology majors and speech pathology majors. Not open to biology/biotechnology majors. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    BIO 1190 Basic Anatomy and Physiology II


    A basic study of the anatomical and physiological relationships of humans. It includes a lecture sequence on specific systems not covered in Basic Anatomy and Physiology I (BIO 1180 ) with corresponding lab exercises, designed to bring about an understanding of the interrelationships of these systems. Not open to biology/biotechnology majors. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 1180 
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    BIO 1200 Human Biology


    This is a course in biological science and research methodology from the perspective of the human body and its systems. The course lays the foundation of knowledge of biology: the chemistry of living organisms, the cell tissues, organs, organ systems and the organism; homeostasis as it applies to human survival; evolutionary processes; genetic, reproductive and other areas of biotechnology; and the human body systems and how they function and malfunction. Biomedical research, the use of humans as research subjects, and other bioethics issues will be addresssed. Research methodology will include the use of scientific method in laboratory exercises, and critical analyises of research studies. Laboratories will include varied exercises in anatomy, physiology, genetics, evolution and an opportunity for students to design their own experiments. Not open to biology majors, biotechnology majors, or students who have taken an Anatomy and Physiology course. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    BIO 1300 Field Biology


    This course will explore the interrelationships among organisms and the environment. Coverage incudes natural history of the major groups of organisms, basic principles of evolution and basic ecological principles with applications of this knowledge to environmental problems. Laboratory exercises focus on field methods to highlight the scientific method by developing hypotheses, collecting data and analyzing results. Not open to biology/biotechnology majors. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    BIO 1400 Introduction Animal Behavior


    This course is an introduction to the scientific study of animal behavior. Students will learn about the nature of science, the diversity of animal behavior, its evolution, its underlying physiological mechanisms, and the theoretical basis of our modern understanding of behavior. The course emphasizes the natural behavior of non-human animals but will also considerthe implications of the principles of animal behavior for humans and domestic animals. Labs focus on the scientific method, which students will practice by means of observational and manipulative experiments involving live animals in both laboratory and field settings. Not open to biology majors. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    BIO 1630 General Biology I


    For students intending to major in biology, provides a background in biological principles. Similarities and differences between living organisms, both plant and animal, are discussed. Subcellular and cellular structure and function, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, genetics, DNA structure, replication, transcription, and protein synthesis. Open to biology/biotechnology majors. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course Prerequisite(s): Must Pass Fresh Foundation English Test OR ENG 1080   Minimum Grade of D AND Must Pass Fresh Foundation Math Test OR MATH 1060   Minimum Grade of D AND Must Pass Fresh Foundation Reading Test OR BRI 1090   Minimum Grade of D
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    BIO 1640 General Biology II


    The course includes principles of whole organism structure and function with emphasis on organ systems. Required of biology majors. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 1630 
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    BIO 1700 Basic Microbiology


    Structure, function, nutrition and physiology of the various groups of microorganisms. Relationships of microorganisms to environment and to organisms related to health issues are emphasized. Required for nursing and public health majors; not open to biology/biotechnology majors, or students who have taken BIO 3200 . Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    BIO 2020 3D Printing in Biomedicine


    This is an interdisciplinary course incorporating the principles of biomedical engineering design and biological sciences for rapid prototyping of 3D models for application in biomedical therapies using the 3D printing technologies. In the biomedical engineering component of the course, students will be introduced to the fundamentals of computer-aided design (CAD), use and proficiency of Autodesk Fusion360, design collaboration and ideation using the cloud software management system, dynamic simulations of component assembly, fundamentals of 3D printing, types and operation of 3D printers, and rapid prototyping using 3D printers. In the biological sciences component of the course, students will be introduced to the foundation of animal anatomy and physiology, biomechanics of motor system, and select research topics on the use of 3D printers in biomedical research and therapy.
    This course fulfills UCC Area-2A Expression: Arts and Communication.  Successful completion of Math Basic Skills Requirements. Students may be admitted into the course based on the results of a placement test or by instructor’s permission.
     
    Credits: 3.0
  
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    BIO 2050 Cell Biology


    A study of the physiological and biochemical processes that regulate and maintain cell function. Cellular and subcellular structures are studied particularly as applicable to cell function.  Course is Writing Intensive Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: BIO 1630  
    Credits: Credits: 4.0
  
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    BIO 2060 General Genetics


    A study of some of the basic principles and laws of genetics as revealed by modern molecular-genetic approaches. The intention is to familiarize the student with the organization and properties of hereditary material (nucleic acids) and highlight some of the critical experiments that laid the foundations of our understanding. All sections of this course are technology intensive. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 1630 
    Credits: 4.0
  
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    BIO 2490 Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior


    Introduction to the study of ecology, evolution, and behavior. Diversity and classification, history of life, evolutionary theory, population growth and regulation, species diversity and community structure, energy flow and nutrient cycling, ethology, behavior genetics, evolution of behavior, sociobiology, behavioral ecology. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 1640 
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 3020 Human Heredity


    A lecture course on the basic tenets of genetics including the organization, function and regulation of heredity material with an emphasis on human and medical applications. Includes the ethical ramifications of genetic testing, gene transfer and related areas. Recommended for nursing and public health majors. Not open to biology/biotechnology majors. Lecture only. Prerequisite(s): BIO 1130  OR BIO 1140  OR BIO 1180  OR BIO 1200  OR BIO 1300 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    BIO 3080 Animal Physiology


    Introduction to the general principles of animal physiology with a focus on human body systems and their relationships. Coverage includes: cell and molecular physiology, muscle physiology, nerve cell conduction, sensory reception, synaptic transmission, neural organization and reflexes, physiology of blood, cardiopulmonary physiology, circulation, gas exchange, digestion, body fluid regulation, development, endocrinology, and reproduction. Laboratory exercises include studies on both invertebrates and vertebrates, including humans. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 2050  AND BIO 2490 
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 3120 Advanced Anatomy and Physiology


    Advanced studies in human physiology. Emphasis on cardiology, circulation, respiration, acid-base balance, water balance and disorders of the nervous system. For nursing majors; open to others with some physiology background; not open to biology/ biotechnology majors. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 1130  AND CHEM 1330 
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 3180 Zoology


    This course is a study of the diversity of animal life from marine invertebrates to terrestrial arthropods, and incudes the five major vertebrate groups: fishes, amphibians, reptiles mammals and birds. Special emphasis will be placed on biological principles relevant to the modern study of zoology such as adaptation and natural selection, structure-function relationships, and developemental genetics. Students will learn to identify members of major animal taxa as well as the relationships among these animal groups, and will acquire skills in zoological laboratory techniques through field collecting, dissection, and live-organism research projects. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 2490 
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 3200 Microbiology


    Advanced studies on the structure and function of micro-organisms with emphasis on bacteria and viruses. The cultivation of microorganisms, microbial metabolism, ecology, immunology and virology are discussed. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 2060  OR BIO 206 AND CHEM 1620 
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 3330 Field Entomology


    A field-based approach to the vast diversity of animal life, through tthe study of the lives of insects and other arthropods. Entomology ( the study of insects) will be used as a focal subject to provide examples of basic biological principles in the subfields of physiology, life history, ecology, behavior, and evolution. Students will complete a significant project in the collection and identification of arthropods from multiple habitat types in Northern New Jersey The practices of research-quality speciimen collection and curation will be emphasized, with particular attention to the importance of voucher collection, locality data, field notes, sampling methods, and quality record-keeping. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 2490 
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 3350 Field Botany


    A survey of the native seed plants commonly found in the northern New Jersey environment; emphasis is on field work, identification of specimens, both in the field and in the laboratory, and the relationship of different species sharing common habitats. Major seed plant families are discussed in lecture. Lecture and lab. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 1640 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    BIO 3400 Ecology


    An upper-level ecology course providing a general survey of ecological structure and dynamics at various levels of organization including the level of: the individual organism, populations, communities, ecosystems, and the biosphere. Coverage will include applications to conservation, resource management, pollution control, and ecosystem sustainability. Laboratory exercises will include field and laboratory methods, data analysis, and computer modeling. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 1630  AND BIO 1640  AND BIO 2050  AND BIO 2060  AND BIO 2490 
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 3450 Conservation Biology


    An examination of the recent, unprecedented losses of global biological diversity and analysis of conservation strategies designed to prevent, minimize and/or repair ecological damage. Conservation of biodiversity is considered from an ecological perspective, then integrated with economical and political issues to explore the implications of national and international conservation efforts. Lecture only. Prerequisite(s): BIO 2490 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    BIO 3500 Animal Behavior


    A survey of animal behavior, including physiological aspects and ecological and adaptive implications. This course is writing intensive. Lecture only. Biology Majors only. Prerequisite(s): BIO 2490  with a grade of C- or better.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    BIO 3520 Economic Botany


    Explores the importance of plants and plant products in terms of food, clothing, shelter, and medicines, as well as their aesthetic value to humankind. A historical perspective of agriculture and the implication of modern plan biotechnology on traditional plant cultivation are an integral part of the course. Lecture only. Prerequisite(s): BIO 1640 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    BIO 3610 General Botany


    An introduction to the biology of the plant kingdom; structural, functional, economical, ecological, and evolutionary aspects of plants. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 2060 
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 3650 Plant Physiology


    A study of the processes of the living plant including growth, development, water relations, respiration, photosynthesis, photorespiration, hormone action, and environmental relationships. Emphasis placed on experimental understanding of these processes and their integration into the whole plant and its environment. The laboratory includes a student project. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 2050 
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 3720 Mathematical Models in The Biological Sciences


    Lecture and computer-lab course on the formulation, analysis, and interpretation of mathematical models in biology and medicine. A computer laboratory will give students hands on experience in developing and analyzing their own models. Applications to “real-world” problems in diverse areas of biology will be emphasized. Prerequisite(s): BIO 1630  AND MATH 1600 
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 3950 Honors Literature Seminar


    This course serves as an intensive introduction to reading and criticism of biological scholarship via select papers from the primary literature. Designed for 3rd-year Honors students, the course will move students who are preparing for major senior research projects into addressing the literature across the life sciences, and in their area of interest in particular. Students will read, evaluate, and critically discuss papers on a weekly basis and write a review-style final paper on a scientific topic of their choosing. Students will be encouraged to choose a topic close to their Honors research project, which should be in development by the time they take this course. This will allow students to make supervised progress toward their Independent Study proposals and Senior Thesis work. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in BIO 2050  and BIO 2060  . Good standing in Honors.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    BIO 3990 Selected Topics


    A topic not covered by an existing course is offered as recommended by the department and approved by the dean.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0
  
  •  

    BIO 4020 Aquatic Ecology


    A critical examination of the ecology of fresh water biota with special attention to the physical features of the environment. Surveys are made of streams, ponds and lakes in the environs. Three all-day field trips included. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 3420 OR BIO 3440
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 4110 Physiology of Human Reproduction and Fertility


    This course helps to increase the knowledge and understanding of mammalian reproduction with emphasis on humans. It helps develop the student’s ability to make informed and ethical judgements concerning issues of reproductive rights and responsiblities. Current issues such as cloning, in vitro fertilization and the use of fetal tissues for research are discussed.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    BIO 4160 Comparative Animal Physiology


    A comparative approach to the basic physiological processes of animals. Emphasis on the functional modifications animals develop in order to cope with their environment. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 2050  AND BIO 2490  AND CHEM 0610 AND CHEM 1610 
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 4170 Histology


    The microanatomy, organization and function of normal mammalian tissues. Study of tissues and organs by light microscopy composes the laboratory component of the course. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 3080 
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 4210 Developmental Biology


    The study of embryonic change in living organisms. Cellular and biochemical mechanisms that account for the emergence of form in embryos and regenerating tissues are explored. A broad range of organisms are considered. Both living and preserved embryos are studied in the laboratory. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 2050  AND BIO 2060 
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 4220 Human Physiology


    Designed to develop a clear understanding of the human body.  Emphasis is on homeostatic principles and processes.  The functioning of human body systems and their interrelationships receive major attention.  


      Prerequisite(s): BIO 2050  (Minimum Grade of C-) and BIO 2490   (Minimum Grade of C-)
    Credits: 3.0

  
  •  

    BIO 4240 Molecular Biology


    An introduction to molecular biology with emphasis on nucleic acid structure and function, and the application of gene splicing. Ethical issues associated with genetic engineering are explored. The course is team taught by members of the biotechnology faculty, who each brings his/her own expertise to this basic course. Lecture only. Restricted to Biotechnology majors; Biology majors may register with permission of instructor.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    BIO 4300 Biotechnology:DNA


    Techniques of DNA purification and quantification. Students analyze DNA by Southern transfer, prepare plasmid and phage vectors and clone sequences into those vectors. Antibiotic selection, filter screening and hybridization analysis of cloned libraries are performed. Related topics include prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene structure, choice and construction of vectors and applications of genetic engineering. Lecture and lab. Restricted to Biotechnology majors; Biology majors may register with permission of instructor. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 4310 Biotechnology:Cell Culture


    Focuses on the theory and practice of cell culture in the biotechnology laboratory. Plant embryo culture and proto-plast culture are performed, and cultured plant cells are used in genetic engineering experiments. Primary animal cell cultures and continuous cell lines are propagated. Related topics include lab safety, aseptic techniques, growth cycles, cloning of cells, specialized techniques and applications, contamination, organogenesis, and cell transformation. Lecture and lab. Restricted to Biotechnology majors; Biology majors may register with permission of instructor. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 4340 Geonomics and Bioinformatics


    Genomics has transformed the field of biology by allowing scientists to ask multi-disciplinary questions and gain a systems view of biology and biological processes. As such, genomics and related fields (proteomics, metabolomics, etc.) have become commonplace in all areas of biology, from biomedicine to ecology. This course introduces students to the theoretical and historical background of genomics and the bioinformatics tools used to analyze sequence and genomic data. The texts and selected literature will cover topics including genome sequencing (traditional and next generation), assembly, annotation, a survey of published genome projects including the Human Genome Project, comparative genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and synthetic biology. Students will also learn various computer programs used to analyze sequence and genomic data and work with real datasets. This course provides students with a framework to explore these disciplines in their future scientific careers and prepares students for advanced study and research in molecular biology, biotechnology, and bioinformatics. Lecture and Computer Lab. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in BIO 2050  andBIO 2060  
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 4430 Evolutionary Medicine


    Evolutionary medicine is an integrative discipline that applies evolutionary knowledge to the understanding of human biology, both normal and abnormal, to create a holistic understanding of how health and disease emerge. This course explores the roles of natural selection, genetic variation, developmental plasticity, and cultural evolution on human health traits such as immunity, metabolism, puberty, senescence, and psychology. Intended primarily for students considering medical and health professions, this course is designed to implement the recommendations for scientific foundations for future physicians made by the American Association of Medical Colleges, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and the National Academy of Sciences.
      Prerequisite(s): BIO 2490  with a grade of C- or better
  
  •  

    BIO 4440 Evolution


    The history of evolutionary theory, heredity, populations, classification, speciation, adaptation, evidence for organic evolution, vertebrate and human evolution and the problem of human population. Lecture only. Prerequisite(s): BIO 2490 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    BIO 4500 Molecular Biology of Prokaryotes


    A detailed examination of the molecular biology of bacteria and bacteriophages. DNA structure and replication, prokaryotic gene expression (transcription, translation, genetic code and regulation), microbial genetics, plasmids, transposons and genetic engineering are covered. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 2060  AND CHEM 2520 
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 4600 Pharmacology


    This course introduces the students to the study of pharmacology by surveying diseases of various body systems and the drugs being developed to treat them. Topics include basic pharmacological principles, classification of drugs used to treat human disease and their mechanisms of action and accompanying side effects. The revolutionary impact of developments in molecular genetics, genomics, and proteomics is emphasized. Prerequisite(s): BIO 2050  AND BIO 2060 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    BIO 4630 Terrestrial Plant Ecology


    Introduction to the scientific study of plant ecology. Topics include population and community dynamics, evolution of life history traits, physiological responses to environmental stresses, plant-animal interactions, and the role of vegetation in ecosystem processes. Field and laboratory studies explore experimental and analytical techniques used in plant ecology. All sections of this course are writing intensive. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 2490 
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    BIO 4700 Bioethics


    Introduces principles of bioethics and how they are applied in the analysis of modern advances in medical, biological and environmental science. The course explores the roots of bioethics, and how history, laws, traditions, business, and politics have influenced modern bioethics. Modern bioethical principles are studied in relation to the beginning of life, the end of life, genetic technology and eugenics, biotechnology, patients’ rights, animal rights, research methods, and environmental issues. Lecture only
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    BIO 4740 Neuroscience


    The course uses an interdisciplinary approach to present an understanding of interdependence between the deep brain structures and proper functioning of the nervous system.  Emphasis is on obtaining a thorough working knowledge of the physiology of the nervous system and the emergent behaviors which result from their neural interactions. Students will be charged an additional Biology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in BIO 2050  , BIO 2060  , and BIO 2490  
    Credits: 4.0
 

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