Jun 06, 2020  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog

Courses


 

Other Courses

  
  •  

    HSS 2001 Liberal Arts Pioneer to Professional


    Liberal Arts Pioneer to Professional is a one-credit course that allows students to explore career options and the tools necessary for professional life after graduation. This course will help students better understand the skills attained and flexibility of degrees in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. This course will also help students develop a professional portfolio including a resume, cover letter, writing sample, professional networking profile, and elevator pitch that can be utilized during their internship and job search process. 


     
    Credits: 1.0


Accounting

  
  •  

    ACCT 2110 Financial Accounting


    Introductory course in the fundamental principles of accounting, the theory of debit and credit, account classification, preparation of working papers, adjusting, closing, reversing entries, and preparation of basic financial statments. Use of spreadsheet and word processing computer applications.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ACCT 2120 Managerial Accounting


    Introduces basic concepts of cost accounting and the use of accounting as a decision-making tool for management. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2110  
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ACCT 3110 Intermediate Accounting I


    Review of basic financial statements and in-depth study of accounting principles advanced by responsible professional organizations in the classification, presentation, and disclosure of assets required for external users of financial information. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2110  AND ACCT 2120  
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ACCT 3120 Intermediate Accounting II


    An in-depth study of accounting principles advanced by responsible professional organizations in the classification, presentation, and disclosure of liabiliies and stockholders’ equity required for external users of financial information. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2110  AND ACCT 2120  AND ACCT 3110 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ACCT 3200 Accounting Information Systems


    This course is designed to prepare students how to use technology during the accounting process. The course takes a transaction cycles approach to AIS that focuses conceptually on the primary sources of data, data flows, logical tasks, accounting records, and internal control and EDP auditing. It also teaches students how to use full-fledged commercial accounting software (QuickBooks.) This is a technology intensive course. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2120  and ACCT 3110 .
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ACCT 3400 Cost Accounting


    Cost accounting and its contribution to management, the cost accounting cycle, cost data accumulation, job order costing, process cost accounting procedures, materials, labor and overhead costing and control, costing of by-products, co-products, and joint products. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2120  AND ECON 2110 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ACCT 3700 Auditing


    Reviews the procedures and practices used in auditing the financial trasactions and statements of an organization. Internal control, test of trasactions and audit standards employed are discussed and demonstrated by actually doing an audit of a practice company. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2120  AND ACCT 2110  AND ACCT 3110  AND ACCT 3120 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ACCT 3990 Selected Topics


    A topic not covered by an existing course.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0
  
  •  

    ACCT 4100 Taxation I


    A study of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code with emphasis on income taxation of individuals. Provides practice in the preparation of tax returns and solution of case problems. Concentrates on the problems of the U.S. individual income tax. Also examines taxation of corporations and partnerships. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2110  AND ACCT 2120   Cross Listed Course(s): FIN 4100  FINP 4090 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ACCT 4110 Taxation II


    A study of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code with emphasis on the taxation of corporations, partnerships, estates, and trusts. Federal payroll, gift and estate, and New Jersey taxes are also covered. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2110  AND ACCT 2120  AND (ACCT 4100  OR FIN 4100 ) Cross Listed Course(s): FIN 411 FIN 4110 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ACCT 4200 Advanced Accounting


    An in-depth study of principles used in accounting for parent and subsidiary companies, partnerships, and other specialized areas of accounting. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3120  AND ACCT 3110  AND ACCT 2120  AND ACCT 2110 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ACCT 4300 Advanced Accounting II


    Intensive review and analysis of basic and advanced concepts, skills, and principles. Imperative for students who intend to apply for a certifying examination. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3120 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ACCT 4400 Government and Not-for-profit Accounting


    This course covers accounting and financial reporting for governmental and not-for-profit entities. The emphasis is on teaching students the significance of reported information and how both users and preparers can interpret and analyze governmental and not-for-profit accounting information. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2120 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ACCT 4850 Practicum in Accounting


    A course of study designed especially for the supervised practical application of previously studied theory in a group setting. Done uder the supervision of a faculty sponsor and coordinated with a business organization.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ACCT 4860 Business Case Writing


    This is a cross-disciplinary course that represents the second part of the 6-credit practicum Honors option, which must be conducted over two semesters and undertaken in the junior or senior year. It will be a core component of the Practicum Honors option. Honors Practicum credits will be applied towards major concentration requirements. The course involves writing an effective business case based on the consulting report or business plan completed in the practicum course. This course will be supervised by a mentor chosen from the Cotsakos College of Business Academically Qualified (AQ) faculty members who participated in the corresponding practicum course. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 4850  Cross Listed Course(s): ECON 4860  FIN 4860  FINP 4860  GLBS 4860  MGT 4860  MKT 4860  RPS 4860 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ACCT 4900 Internship in Accounting


    This is a cooperative education / field work experience. The mission of the intership program is to provide students with a valuable employment experience by working, uninterrupted for a significant amount of time, with a public, private, or governmental entity in the student’s geographical area. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 3120 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ACCT 4990 Independent Study


    A special project, supervised by a faculty advisor.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0

Anthropology

  
  •  

    ANTH 1300 Origin and Diversity of Humankind


    This course provides a comprehensive understanding of what it means to be human through an integrated study of biology and culture. Using a broad 4-field approach (Biological, Cultural, Linguistic, Archaeological) it traces the evolutionary development of uniquely human traits and examines the immense diversity of human culture, past and present. While acknowledging differences, students will develop an appreciation for the unity of modern humans as a result of our shared ancestry. This anthropological perspective will help students recognize our interdependent connection with the natural world and each other as a basis for dealing with the complexity of modern human life. Some sections of this course are writing intensive.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 2000 Human Origins


    An introduction to the biological perspective in anthropology, including primate evolution, the living, non-human primates and their behavior, the human fossil record, modern variation and ancient through modern bio-behavioral adaptations. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 2001 Human Biocultural Evolution


    How did Homo sapiens become an invasive biological species occupying diverse terrestrial habitats and transforming environments through progressively disruptive cultural practices? Beginning with a firm grounding in scientific methodology, this introductory course surveys the evolutionary trajectory of our species over deep geological time, highlighting critical periods characterized by major biocultural transformations affecting how humans adapted to their local environments. The more recent history of Homo sapiens is then examined, focusing on the complex interaction between our evolving species and the ecosystems it inhabits within the context of the cultural systems that mediate this interaction. Finally, we turn our attention to the future, specifically on the sustainability of human behaviors that promote our biological persistence yet increasingly impact life on a global scale.
    Credits: 4.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 2020 Diversity and Equity in Schools


    Schools are central to the socialization of youngsters and to the formation and maintenance of modern nation-states. American schools transmit core values and knowledge and support a meritocracy where social mobility seems the outcome of talent and effort. While offering freedom and opportunity, they reproduce social structures and perpetuate systems of class, gender, and race inequality. This course critically analyzes the role that schools play in the cultural production of the “educated” person. It identifies links between school practices and the community, the state, and the economy, which help explain the disproportionate failure of disadvantaged groups. The course challenges future teachers to think about schools as sites of intense cultural politics and to consider the effects of history and power on educational processes. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 2030 Exploring Asia


    This multi-disciplinary course introduces students to the geography, history, culture, society, economics, and politics of India, China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia. The foundation for the Asian Studies program, this course is taken at the beginning of the course of study. This course is taught collectively by participating Asian Studies faculty members. Cross Listed Course(s): ASN 2010 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 2080 Civilizations of South Asia


    A thematic introduction to the continuities and variations in the cultural history of the Indian subcontinent that examines the concept of civilization, including ideas of the past, forms of authority and resistance, the interaction of relgious traditions, the colonial encounter, and the rise of competing nationalisms. (Portal to South Asia track) Cross Listed Course(s): HIST 2800  , ASN 2800  
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 2090 Disaster! Learning From Japan


    Catastrophes come in many forms– man-made and natural, unexpected and foreseeable. “Disaster!” conjures threat, fear, and trauma from events requiring collective action, both immediate and long-term. Matching student concerns and faculty expertise, each class will choose from among past and/or looming catastrophes for in-depth analysis and guidance for applied action. Students will develop action plans and strategies to prepare themselves and mobilize communities in our region to react to or avoid cataclysms through community-based learning experiences. Linking directly to collaborating overseas organizations and actors in Asia, students will engage with those whose civic energy and political and social action have faced challenges posed by such events. Implementing multi-disciplinary approaches and international outreach to victims, activists, NGOs, and governments in impacted areas via contemporary technologies, our students will practice thinking globally and acting locally to consider how to prevent and recover from catastrophes, whether man-made, natural, or ‘hybrid’. This course is Technology Intensive.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 2100 Digging The Past: An Introduction To Archaeology


    This course introduces students to the anthropological sub-discipline of archaeology, which is the study of past human societies as revealed through the recovery and analysis of the material culture and environmental data left behind. Archaeology is essential for learning about prehistoric non-literate societies (which make up over 99% of human history), and archaeological research supplements,confirms and even changes historical analyses based on written records. Archaeology is multidisciplinary in nature, encompassing aspects of the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities and the arts. This course will cover basic method and theory, and survey key events as revealed in the archaeological record over the past 3 million years. It will also address recent applied topics in archaeological research, including community archaeology, heritage sustainability & preservation and cultural resource management. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 2200 African Anthropology


    The course presents the African continent and its diverse environmental settings. Archaeological evidence from the multiple sites in eastern South Africa are employed to address human and cultural evolution theories and implications. Evidence for ancient civilizations, permanent settlements, beginnings of farming, and local iron-smelting technology are critically addressed.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 2300 Culture, Identity & Cognition


    This course explores the concept of “culture” from a ‘biocultural’ anthropological perspective focusing on how culture shapes two critical dimensions of human existence: a) Identity and group belonging, and b) Cognition and knowledge. Students will explore the culture concept and engage with debates on cultural identity formation and politics of identity. This will set the foundation for exploration of the relation between culture and ‘human nature,’ the centrality of culture to the evolutionary history of humans, and the role of culture and language in the process of knowledge acquisition and transmission. This is a writing intensive course.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 2350 World Heritage Sites


    Utilizing prehistoric and historic sites recognized by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as “World Heritage” sites (http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/) and other sites of major significance, this course provides students with broad global, temporal, and developmental perspectives on the sequence of culture change using a global perspective. Beginning with the origins of the human species, selected sites will illustrate the diversity of cultures and the major developmental stages in cultural evolution in the Old World and New World. The course will utilize anthropological interpretations to demonstrate the significance of global cultural change as related to social and political organization, economics and trade, resource procurement, technology, environment, belief systems including major religions, warfare and conflict, diffusion, migration, colonialism, and the arts and architecture.    Course is an Area 6  - Global Awareness.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 2400 Language Matters


    This course focuses on the uniquely human capacity to use language and the complex interrelations of language and power. Students will explore the evolutionary roots of language, the universal features of language, and the relationship between language, thought, culture and society. They will examine how people use language to enact race, class, ethnicity, gender and sexuality in everyday life, and how language is used to construct difference and reproduce, manipulate and contest social inequalities. Through reading and analysis of ethnographic material, the primary objective of the course is to recognize the power that language has on its speakers and the power that speakers can exert by means of language. This is a writing intensive course.  Course is UCC - Area 4 Diversity and Justice.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 2500 Ways of Seeing: Introduction to Visual Anthropology


    This course will explore the meaning of visual expression from the perspective of anthropology. Students will critically think about how knowledge and beliefs influence human perceptions and behavior, examine forms of visual expression from pre-historic to modern times in a global context, and consider the stylistic, social scientific, commercial and political agendas that influence the production of visual documents. Students will review images produced by anthropologists, use photography and video to create image records of cultural practices in an ethnographic context, and debate the truth and ethics of productions. The course will be technologically intensive and offer skills for anyone considering ethnographic research, media analysis, material culture studies, or critical engagements with the arts and other forms of cultural display (such as museums).
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 2520 Evolutionary Bases of Human Behavior


    This course explores the evolutionary bases of human behavior from a multidisciplinary perspective. It emphasizes the evolutionary and adaptive biological substrates and predispositions which help account for the complexity of modern humans. Evolutionary principles, comparative anatomical and behavioral evidence, the fossil record, neuroanatomical and the uniquely human archeological record are used to trace the anatomical and behavioral evolution of Homo sapiens. The roots of modern human behavior will be considered from the perspectives of adaptation and antiquity. Students will not only develop a thorough understanding of what it means to be human, but also an extensive knowledge of the environmental and biological forces which shaped the human mind. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters only. Cross Listed Course(s): PSY 2520 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 2570 Sex, Gender and Sexuality: Beyond Nature vs. Nurture


    Focusing on the complex interplay between biology and culture, this course uses evidence, concepts, theories and perspectives from the four fields of anthropology (biological, socio-cultural, linguistic, archaeological) to explore diverse patterns of sex, gender and sexuality amongst humans, human ancestors and non-human primates. This perspective will form the groundwork from which to critically evaluate discourses that reduce sex, gender and sexuality to a matter of nature alone; notions used to legitimize inequalities of sex and sexuality and pathologize non-normative sex, gender and sexualities. Adopting a social justice approach, we will explore contemporary struggles of self-determination in which sex, gender and sexuality are central. Some sections of this course are writing intensive. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Cross Listed Course(s): WGS 2570 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 2600 Myth and Folklore and The Modern World


    Myth and Folklore play important multiple roles in all cultures. This course looks at the patterns of moral values, social order, customs and religious beliefs as they are expressed through traditional folklore (narratives, songs, jokes etc.) and modern folklore (mass media, urban cultures). The course also explores common themes and provides a variety of theoretical models for explanation. Some sections of this course are writing intensive. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 2700 Anthropology of Inequality


    This course surveys anthropological contributions to mapping the relationship between human differences, power and inequality. The course emphasizes current intersecting inequalities and how they are lived and challenged in various parts of the world. The course first expands the scope of the study of inequality in time in order to explore how inequalities came to be, how they persist and transform. Spotlighting change and possibilities, the course prepares students to contribute to debates concerning the nature of inequality in the public sphere and advocate for social justice.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 2800 Introduction to Transgender Studies


    This course provides a general introduction to the emerging, multidisciplinary field of transgender studies. Adopting a holistic framework that views the development of gender identity and expression as a complex dialogue between biology and culture, it challenges the hegemonic artifice of a “natural” binary opposition between female/male & woman/man. Citing current, historical and cross-cultural examples of individuals and communities who destabilize prevailing sex/gender norms the course critiques how societies react to the presence of “other” gender identities, embodiments and expressions. The course also reviews the recent increase in trans-visibility and advocacy, and the ensuing challenges to legal, medical and social norms and attitudes predicated on the existence of only two kinds of gendered persons. Prerequisite(s): Must complete 18 Credits of area 1-3 before being able to register for area 4.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3010 Research Methods in Anthropology


    This course provides student with basic tools for designing, conducting and appraising ethnographic research projects. Students will gain a better understanding of qualitative and quantitative methods through collaborative research, field activities and class discussions. Emphasis will be placed on using techniques for data collection and analyses, evaluating research procedures and outcomes, and developing technological skills appropriate for the discipline of Anthropology. This is a technology intensive course. Course offered Fall Semester only. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2300 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3011 Anthro Sem: Public Eng in Anth


    This seminar is designed to enable students to gain an appreciation of the way in which anthropologists engage with debates and issues of concern in the wider public sphere, civil society, public policy, and local and global communities. The seminar will address scholarship that cuts across the discipline’s different fields through critical reading of current work. Students will explore essential anthropological questions and reflect on the role anthropologists can or should play in shaping the societies in which we live. Seminar topics will vary. This course is writing intensive.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3040 Prehistory of The Far East


    The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the prehistory and paleo-anthropology of the Far East (East and Southeast Asia, all inclusive). The course begins with a survey of the history of the theoretical and substantive discoveries which have influenced and/or continue to influence our understanding of the human evolution and behavior of the region. Course offered every year. Cross Listed Course(s): ASN 3040 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3080 Native North Americans


    This course introduces indigenous North American peoples, including peoples called Indians as well as Inuits (Eskimos) and Aleuts, from their origins to the present day. Students examine archaeological, ethnohistorical, ethnographic, and historical data to study cultural processes and changes over time. Topics covered also include inter-ethnic and interracial issues in the United States and Canada. Course offered every year.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3100 Global Transformations and The Human Condition


    This course develops an understanding of the experiences of “globalization” as a historical phase of capitalism, and “development” as a post-World War II set of practices. It will analyze specific “global” problems as manifested in the lives of large sections of the world’s poor and marginalized populations across multiple societies. These problems include: poverty and inequality; livelihoods and food security; endemic hunger, malnutrition and healthcare systems; overconsumption, population and environmental degradation; international debt; displacement and migration; intellectual property rights and indigenous knowledge; wars and cultural conflicts. Emphasis will be on contradictory impacts on people and societal prospects in Asia, Africa and Latin America, and on marginalized populations in advanced capitalist countries. Methods to facilitate a just and sustainable future for humanity will also be explored. Course offered Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters only. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1300   or HIST 1030  or HIST 1040   or POL 1100   or SOC 1010   or SOC 1020  
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3140 Old World Prehistory


    There is almost no part of the world or period of its history that is not a subject of vigorous and sophisticated investigation by archaeologists. This course surveys the origins and development of human society. World prehistory is best understood as the history of contacts between peoples previously isolated from one another. The course provides an account of prehistoric life and the roots of modern societies and empires. It offers to the student an understanding of the evolution of humans and the cultures they established, from the first traces of humanity to the creation of early literate societies. The major topics covered include the evolution of tool making, the development of religion, the origins of language, the importance of agriculture, the beginnings of warfare, and the creation of hierarchical societies and hereditary ranking.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3160 Daily Life in Japan


    Examining Japanese life through direct experience and classroom study in Japan and/or the United States, this course explores home, community, religion, business practices, education, and the arts, possibly augmented by on-site visits and interaction with visitors specializing in Japan’s regional cultures, dance, song, calligraphy, cuisine, and other elements of contemporary Japan.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3250 Faces of Diversity


    This course examines the global character and connectivity of the USA through a focus on global migration. It uses an anthropological perspective that incorporates historical, social and cultural dimensions of immigration. The course explores how governmental institutions and politics have shaped and responded to immigration to the United States, but with an emphasis on the post-1965 period. Topics include transnational migration and Diasporas, how immigrant lives and social relations are structured in terms of culture, ethnicity, race, class and gender in this era of global migration flows. The course further examines the extent of U.S. involvement in many of the countries of origin of the immigrants, with an analysis of the impact the involvement has had on migration. The changing racial and ethnic relations in American gateway cities as a result of migration, public opinions and issues of contemporary relevance such as undocumented immigration are explored. this is a Writing Intensive course. Cross Listed Course(s): ANTH 325
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3300 Anthropology of Tourism


    A cross-cultural, transactional view of tourism as involving an encounter between tourist-generating and host societies that may be perceived as a process or a system. Imageries of pleasure travel as it reflects a symbolic world will be examined. The focus is upon the changes wrought upon the host society and the sociopolitical and cultural consequences of tourism. Course offered every year.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3350 Latina Testimonies


    This course is an introduction to the similarities and differences in migration/annexation/colonization and consequential social status informing the experience of Latinas in the United States. Special attention is paid to subjectivity and representation by social signifiers such as gender, race, class, and sexualities. While the course title assumes a pan-ethnic label, the course explores the complex diversity of women who trace their ancestry to geographical areas including Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic. Prerequisite(s): (WGS 1100  OR WGS 1500  OR AWS 1500  OR AWS 1550 ) AND ENG 1100  
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3400 Applied Anthropology


    What can anthropologists offer to the solution of contemporary human problems? What practical contributions can their theories, methods, and insights make to the world? This course explores avenues traditionally sought by anthropologists to apply their knowledge to complex and diverse social situations, and debates the consequences of such involvement and ethical dilemmas they face. The course seeks to prepare students for a wide range of career applications. It offers training in the analysis of social systems and interactions, encourages the development of specialized knowledge in other fields, and creates awareness of opportunities for policy-oriented research, program evaluation, cultural brokerage, and advocacy.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3410 Law in Society and Culture


    This course examines mechanisms societies have developed to resolve disputes. Comparing American society to other industrial and preindustrial societies, law and political organizations are shown to have cultural ways of coping with conflict strongly linked to variations in subsistence, economy, and social stratification. Course offered every year.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3450 Cultural Resource Management


    This course explores the community implications of protected and potentially vulnerable cultural resources (historic, ethnographic, architectural, archaeological) in the United States and, more specifically, the ability to recognize such resources within communities. Students will gain experience applying federal, state and local laws, policies and procedures to identify significant archaeological and historic sites, and to consider the means to preserve or otherwise protect their inherent research value and community interests. Students will become familiar with cultural resource law and practices through the investigation of significant cultural resources in nearby communities and throughout the U.S. This is a Writing Intensive course. Course is UCC - Area 5 Community and Civic Engagement.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3500 Shamans Witches and Magic


    This course introduces students to the anthropological study of religion. Theories about the origins and functions of religion are examined, along with the role of religion in traditional non-Western societies. Shamanism, witchcraft, magic, religion in non-Western medicine, and religion conflict and change in the modern world are among the topics covered. Some sections of this course are Writing Intensive. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3520 Our Most Unwelcome Guests: Human Co-Evolution With Pathogens


    This course provides students with an understanding of the dynamic interplay between human cultures and pathogens. It provides an historical as well as an etiological perspective of the dramatic turn our species takes, starting with the advent of agriculture and the rise of civilizations throughout the world. Special attention is given to the inadvertent “biological warfare” ensuing from human migration, trade routes, and colonial expansion; the role that cultural beliefs and practices play in spreading or containing disease agents, and the nascent forensic analyses that lead to the discovery of our “most unwelcome guests.” Prerequisite(s): Course UCC Area 6 pre-requisites
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3530 Comparative Cultures


    The comparative study of cultures in sociocultural anthropology. Introduces students to the Human Relations Area Files (HRAF) and ethnological theory and method.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3540 Forensic Osteology


    This course is designed to present the application of physical anthropology to forensic science. Forensic anthropologists mostly deal with skeletal and dental evidence, therefore a significant amount of the course deals with the normal growth and development of these tissues, along with how they are modified in life and postmortem. The material covered should be of interest not only to students enrolled in anthropology (including archeology) but also in biology, criminal justice, nursing or any other field in which knowledge of skeletal biology may be required. Course offered Spring Semester only.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3560 Urban Anthropology


    Examines from a cross-cultural perspective the ecological and social changes that occur from urban growth. Course offered every other year.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3570 Kinship


    Kin groups ranging from several to thousands of people serve important economic, social, political, and religious functions in every society. Different types of marriage and family systems will be compared in a global and evolutionary context. Course offered every other year.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3590 Cultural Change Latin America


    The origin and development of processes of cultural change in Latin America. Gives the student an opportunity to learn about the cultural institutions of highly developed indigenous cultures and their influences upon present-day Latin American cultures. Examines current writings on Latin America that deal with social change and helps the student develop scientific objectivity (an anthropological prerequisite) in the analysis of the social problems resulting from change. Particularly useful for international management majors. Course offered every year. Cross Listed Course(s): LAS 390
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3700 Anthropology Social Movements


    This course provides students with a critical understanding of the key issues in the development of social movements and civic action from the perspective of anthropology. Anthropology’s unique on-the-ground and comparative perspective, and its emphasis on particularity and context will afford insights into issues of meaning at the center of social movements. Students will examine various models of public- and field-generated scholarship and apply this knowledge in a qualitative project that recognizes community members’ knowledge as key to social change in everyday life - where inequalities are experienced and often resisted. Examples of social movements appropriate for ethnographic research: Occupy, Tea Party, buy local, ACORN, immigrant rights, etc. This is a writing intensive course. Course offered Fall Semester only.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3710 Health and Healing


    This course introduces students to concepts of health and healing in the field of medical anthropology. It will explore how the experiences of health and the body vary cross-culturally using contemporary bio-cultural approaches and community-health perspectives. Topics covered include perceptions of illness and the etiology of disease, conceptions of mental health and stigma, the cultural context of infectious diseases the world over, and the implications of biomedical interventions and technology. The course will spotlight how anthropological knowledge can bridge gaps between medical discourse and notions of health and healing throughout the globe.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 3990 Selected Topics


    A topic not covered by an existing course is offered as recommended by the department and approved by the dean.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 4200 Archaeology of North America


    This course surveys the prehistoric and historic archaeology of North American from the earliest human occupations to the end of the nineteenth century. From the big game hunters to the late Pleistocene, to the corn farming chiefdoms visited by De Soto’s expedition, to the settlements of Europeans, to the enslaved peoples of the African diaspora, the course traces the development of diverse cultures through the study and interpretation of their material remains. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 4250 Paleoanthropology


    This course provides an in-depth exploration of the evolution of the human family, the Hominidae. Geological, paleontological, genetic, and archeological evidence from primary and secondary literature is critically assessed. Major topics include the appearance of the earliest hominids, distinguishing the most primitive members of genus Homo, discussing technological changes and their possible implications for early hominid behavior, and an evaluation of competing theories that address the origin of Homo sapiens. Course offered every other Fall semester. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1300  OR ANTH 2000  OR ANTH 4540 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 4540 Primate Biology and Behavior


    This course consists of a broad biological and paleontological survey of our closest mammalian relatives, the Order Primates (prosimians, monkeys, apes, and humans). Study involves the anatomy, biology, and behavior of living non-human primates within the context of modern evolutionary theory. We also examine the evolutionary history of each major non-human primate group as revealed by the fossil record. Course offered every other Fall Semester. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 2000 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 4900 Anthropology Senior Seminar


    This course helps students acquire core professional competencies that facilitate pursuing diverse career paths. It provides students with the tools and resources needed to apply for admission to graduate programs and employment in profit or nonprofit (grant-seeking) agencies. This course fosters critical thinking, oral and written communication skills, and research expertise while building upon knowledge acquired in other upper-level anthropology courses. It nurtures intellectual autonomy, as well as a deeper sense of social commitment and ethical conscience. at least one 400-level anthropology course. Course offered Spring Semester only. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 4200  OR ANTH 4210 OR ANTH 4250  OR ANTH 4540 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 4910 Internship Anthropology


    This course provides qualified students practical work experience in an applied setting. Periodic conferences and a monthly seminar are an integral part of this program. Course offered Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters only.
    Credits: 1.0 - 8.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 4950 Anthropology Field Study


    Provides fieldwork and research opportunities for students who seek to develop practical skills in any of the subfields of general anthropology. Students select specific field school programs in consulation with instructors and based on the availability of projects; these programs are hosted by accredited academic/research institutions, or initiated by William Paterson faculty. In addition to providing hands-on experience, the Field Study in Anthropology seeks to foster international exchanges and promote collaboration on a variety of research projects. Students receive one credit for every 40 hours of field study accumulated, and students may register for Anthropology Field Study repeatedly, for a maximum of 6 credits. Field Study programs may require travel, room, and board fees. Course offered Summer Semester only.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0
  
  •  

    ANTH 4990 Independent Study


    As approved and to be arranged. Course offered Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters only.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0

Arabic

  
  •  

    ARAB 1100 Basic Arabic I


    An introduction to basic standard classical modern Arabic as used all over the Arab world in books, mass media, official records, and documents, etc. The course pays special attention to pronunciation, calligraphy, sentence structure, and vocabulary. It aims at developing the student’s ability to hear, comprehend, read, write, and speak Arabic. Basic grammar is introduced all along the course. Students can only receive a grade higher than a C- in this course
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARAB 1110 Basic Arabic II


    A study of standard classical Arabic used commonly all over the world. Allows for interpretation and in-depth understanding of Arabic prose and poetry. Prerequisite(s): ARAB 1100  
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARAB 2100 Intermediate Arabic I


    Course furthers the study of classical Arabic. It introduces an increasingly difficult level of both oral and written language and fosters the development of reading and listening comprehension. Literary Arabic is presented through prose, fiction, poetry, and journalistic texts appropriate to the intermediate level of proficiency. Prerequisite(s): ARAB 1110  
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARAB 2110 Intermediate Arabic II


    Furthers the study of standard classical Arabic. It furthers a presentation of an increasingly difficult level of both oral and written proficiency and fosters the development of reading and listening comprehension at an intermediate high level. Course begins examination of language variables throughout the Arab-speaking world. Prerequisite(s): ARAB 2100  
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARAB 3990 Selected Topics


    A topic not covered by an existing course is offered as recommended by the department and approved by the dean.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0
  
  •  

    ARAB 4990 Independent Study


    As approved and to be arranged.
    Credits: 1.0 - 6.0

Art History

  
  •  

    ARTH 1010 Understanding Art


    A course for non-art majors addressing selected issues in the history of visual arts. Emphasis is placed on visual literacy: teaching students how to speak, write, and think about art. Course content includes a variety of historical periods and deals with visual media such as painting, sculpture, architecture, graphic arts, photography, and film. Not open to art majors.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 1030 Art and Politics


    A course for non-art majors addressing selected periods and issues in politically inspired/reflective visual arts. Emphasis is placed on the connections between visual arts and politics, and how the political is reflected, discussed and even mediated in visual works. The course will teach students how to speak, write, and think about the inter-relationships between art and politics. Course content addresses a variety of historical periods and visual arts.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 1100 Caves To Cathedrals


    Surveys the visual arts from the time of the Ice Age caves to the great Gothic cathedrals in Europe, both as expressions of past civilizations and as the heritage of contemporary art in Western cultures.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 1200 Renaissance To Revolution


    Presents an overview of art and architecture in the Western world, from the time of Renaissance masters such as Donatello, Leonardo, and Michelangelo in Italy and Durer in northern Europe, to the era of the great Romantic masters such as David in France and Goya in Spain.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 1300 African American Art


    A survey of African American art from the late 18th century to the contemporary period, this course explores the artistic expressions and contributions of Afrricans of African descent in the visual arts, and includes works in painting, sculpture, graphic arts, photography and installation. The course covers various eras including the colonical era, Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, the New Negro Movement, the Black Arts Movement, and self-taught Folk Art with emphasis on identity formation in the cultural, social and political contexts. Cross Listed Course(s): Crosslisted with AWS 1300 .
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2200 Art of Ancient Egypt and The Near East


    Surveys the art and architecture of the cultures that built the first cities, nation-states, and writing systems in the Western world. Studies the awe-inspiring building, fabulous tombs, magnificent sculptures and paintings, and rich mythologies from the times of the first pharaohs and kings up to the time of the appearance of Islam.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2240 Greek and Roman Art


    Examines the surviving visual arts from ancient Greek and Roman societies and surveys works created by other ancient civilizations around the Mediterranean. Ideas to be explored include the interconnectedness of the arts, religion, and the state; the importance of archaeological discoveries; and the powerful impact of Greek and Roman art on later European cultures. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 1010  OR ARTH 1100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2280 Medieval Art


    This course provides an introduction to the visual culture of the European “Middle Ages,” from the conversion of Constantine in the 4th century to the first stages of Renaissance style. Students examine architecture, sculpture, painting, and metalwork from the early Christian, Byzantine, early Medieval, Romanesque, and Gothic periods. In each case, the class investigates the cultural forces that shaped the works of art and discusses the ways in which the objects might have been received in their own times. The course also considers the objects’ relevance in the 21st century. This course is Writing Intensive. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 1010  OR ARTH 1100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2300 Italian Renaissance Art


    Examines one of the most creative and prolific periods in Italian art and cultural history, from circa 1250 to 1600. The course places some of the most famous works of Western art in their historical and cultural contexts, by examining private, civic, and religious patronage, art theory, visual narrative, and artistic collaboration. Artists to be studied include Giotto, Donatello, Raphael, Titian, and Michelangelo. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 1010  OR ARTH 1100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2320 Northern Renaissance Art


    This course explores the luminously beautiful artistic production of Northern Europe (particularly the Netherlands and Germany) from approximately 1400 to 1600. We will examine the paintings, sculpture, and graphic arts of the period in the context of private, civic, and religious patronage, the rise of the art market, international artistic exchange, Humanist theory and culture, and the consequences of the Protestant Reformation. Artists to be studied include Jan van Eyck, Albrecht Dürer, Hieronymus Bosch, and Pieter Bruegel. Class meetings will consist of lectures integrating active discussion as well as in-class writing assignments. This course is Writing Intensive. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 1010  or ARTH 1100 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2330 Arts of Africa


    This course examines the arts of Western and sub-Saharan Africa, from its earliest moments to the modern era. We will study expressive wooden sculptures, fine golden objects, elaborate textiles, and colorful wall paintings, locating them in their social and ritual contexts. as we explore the diversity of African art, we will also examine its transformation in New World contexts such as Cuba, Haiti, and Brazil. Using the Ben Shahn Gallery’s Joan and Gordon Tobias Collection of African Art, we will have direct experience with African objects. This course is Writing Intensive. Cross Listed Course(s): AWS 2330 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2360 Baroque and Rococo Art


    This course examines the dynamic and visually arresting artistic production of the baroque and rococo periods, from approximately 1600 to 1800. The painting, sculpture, and architecture of both periods are studied in relation to their broader historical contexts, including religious and political upheaval, changes in the art market, innovative art theories and techniques, and patronage. Artists to be studied include Caravaggio, Rembrandt, Bernini, Velasquez, and Watteau. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 1200 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2400 Modern Art I


    Surveys the history of art from the time of the French Revolution to the first decade of the twentieth century. Emphasis on the development of major schools and styles, from Neo-Classicism to the Fauves, and on individual contributions by artists such as David, Goya, Delacroix, Manet, and the Impressionists. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 1200 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2500 Modern Art II


    A study of painting, sculpture, and some architecture in Europe and the Americas, from 1910 to the end of the 20th century. Emphasis on schools and styles, from Cubism to Post-Modernism, as well as important individuals such as Picasso, Matisse, Mondrian, Miro, and Pollock. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 2400 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2540 Modern Architecture


    After a brief look at the beginnings of modern architecture in the late eighteenth century, the course focuses on the most significant buildings, architects, building technologies, and architectural theories of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 1010  OR ARTH 1040 OR ARTH 1200 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2560 History Modern Design


    Traces the development of industrial, domestic, and graphic design from the nineteenth century to the present. Themes include the power of the designed environment to shape daily life and the rise of professional designers to celebrity status.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2580 History of Photography


    A study of photography, from its beginning during the second decade of the nineteenth century to the post-modernist photography of the present day. Investigate the development of this most modern of mediums through its technical, social, and aesthetic components. Contributions of important photographers from Europe and the Americas, such as Weston, Alvarez Bravo, Cartier-Bresson, and Walker Evans are analyzed and discussed. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 1010  OR ARTH 1040 OR ARTH 1060 OR ARTH 1200 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2590 History of Film


    Provides an overview of the history of film from its 19th century beginnings to the present day. The primary goal of this course is to give students a fundamental understanding of film history by covering various technical innovations, aesthetic developments, genre conventions, and filmmakers that have paved the way toward shaping the medium as it exists today. The course prepares students to comprehend, conceive, write about and discuss the cinema they experience from an historical perspective and prepares them to understand the broad sweep of the medium. In addition, the course: a. Examines how the Hollywood studio system formed and operated as an organized, sustainable industry b. Explores major international film movements such as German expressionism, Soviet montage, Italian neorealism and the French New Wave c. Exposes the student to methods of cinematic research d. Prepares the student for further advanced film studies
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2600 Modern Film


    Survey the major films from Europe, the United States and the developing world from World War II to the present, and to understand their aesthetic, social, and technical importance. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 1010  OR ARTH 1040 OR ARTH 1060 OR ARTH 1200 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2700 20th Century American Art


    A study of the major movements and individuals in painting, sculpture, and architecture in the United States, from the turn of the twentieth century until the post-modern period. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 2400  OR ARTH 2500  
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2800 Asian Art


    This course presents a general survey of major art forms developed in Eastern, Southern, and Southeastern Asia from the Neolithic period to the early 20th century It will examine ceramics, bronzes, jade, architecture, scupture, painting, woodblock printing, and garden designing, etc. With chronological format, attention will be given to some ineresting points in style, iconography, symbolism, religion, philosophy, aesthetics and history Cross Listed Course(s): ASN 2900 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2840 Art of Precolombian Americas


    This course is an introduction to the arts of ancient american Indians in North, central and South America from the formative period to the conquest of Europeans. Several major cultures will be examined: tje Northwest Cpast, the Southeast, and the Southwest in North America; Olmec, Teotihuacan, MonteAalban, Maya and Aztec in Mesoamerica; and Chavin, Paracas-Nazca, Moche, chimu, and Inca in the South America. The focus will be on the significance of the art and the cultures where certain art forms were applied. the stylistic characeristics of the forms, and the philosophical/religious ideas involved will be emphasized.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2860 Modern Art of Latin America


    A study of the major movements and individuals in painting and sculpture in Latin America during the Modern period (1920s - 1960s). Prerequisite(s): ARTH 2010 or ARTH 2150 Cross Listed Course(s): LAS 2860 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 2900 Gallery Workshop


    An introduction to the world of galleries and museums, this course includes hands-on experience working in the University galleries. Students will learn how exhibits are organized, assist with the design and installation of an exhibit, and learn about basic publicity packets and other essentials of gallery work. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 1010 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 3000 Research Method and Theory in Art History


    This course is the first half of the Art History Senior Capstone sequence. It introduces students to the methods and theories that have defined-and that continue to challenge-the discipline. We will examine and analyze some of the many methodologies that define art history, from its beginnings in Formalism and Biography to Iconography, Marxism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. By reading, writing, and debating about the central issues that inform the study of art, students will begin to understand the complexity of the discipline. Over the course of the semester, students will write a number of critical response papers and journal entries while developing topics for their Senior Thesis projects. Student work will culminate in both oral and written final projects.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 3220 Greek and Roman Art


    This course provides an introduction to the architecture, sculpture, and painting produced by the Aegean, Greek, Etruscan, and Roman civilizations. We will begin with the late Bronze Age (c.1500 BCE) and continue through the Roman Empire (c. 400 CE). Major themes include: the interrelationships of art, religion, and the state in the ancient world; the arts of Greece and Rome as the cultural heritage of the West; and the role of Greek and Roman art in the field of Art History. Class meetings will consist of lectures and some “workshop” periods. During “workshop,” students will participate in active discussions, in-class assignments, and group projects. This course is Writing Intensive.
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 3290 Neoclassic and Romantic Art


    A study of neoclassic and romantic art, with an emphasis on painting and sculpture from the end of the eighteenth century to mid-nineteenth century, concentrating on France, England, Spain, Germany, and Italy. The relationship between art, politics, and national identity, the nature of landscape painting and the idea of the sublime, and individual artists such as David, Ingres, Goya, Gericault, Turner, and Cole are studied in this course. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 1200 
    Credits: 3.0
  
  •  

    ARTH 3310 Art in New York


    Explores New York City as the international center for the visual arts. Students visit world-famous and less familiar museums, galleries, and architectural landmarks.
    Credits: 3.0
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11Forward 10 -> 26